Posts Tagged ‘ Brick ’

Famous Paintings Made Out Of LEGO Bricks


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Marco Sodano, an artist based in Milano, Italy, recreated Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa, The Lady With the Ermine, and the painting Girl with a Pearl Earring by Johannes Vermeer using only LEGO bricks. The perfect mixture of colors used by the artist makes these famous masterpieces easily recognizable.

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Small Attic Loft Apartment In Prague


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The design of this modern loft conversion located in Prague, Czech Republic uses natural materials such as stone, brick and wood to enhance the flat and angular surfaces. Designed by architect Dalibor Hlavacek, the two-storey attic loft makes good use of limited floor space.

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The living room, kitchen, bedroom and bathroom are on the lower floor. The upper gallery, accessible via staircase and a steel footbridge, creates an intimate space for the study, which can also be used as a second bedroom.

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Brick Loft In Vancouver


One of the main goal behind the new re-design of this Vancouver based loft was to give more lightings to have a better place to live. And besides having a main courtyard to which everything lead, Omer Arbel had the idea of combining wood & brick to create a certain tension between the two elements, highlighting light and diversity in the same rooms. The rendering is particularly impressive.

Fake LEGO Ads.


These advertisements for LEGO from agency DDB aren’t real, in as far as they certainly weren’t commissioned by the brickmaker, but they’re still pretty awesome.

Subtractive Art Pieces (Alexandre Farto).


Portuguese-born, London-based artist Alexandre Farto (Vhils) creates arresting portraits by breaking away pieces of walls. He takes his subtractive art to not only galleries and exhibition spaces but also the streets, creating larger-than-life figures in the midst of urban and underused space. Vhils generally first sketches out each piece in spraypaint, before beginning the painstaking process of chipping, sawing, and drilling away at the wall to various depths. He will often add additional color or shading to the newly exposed portions of the wall, creating a visual interplay between the untouched surface, original painted figure, and layers of underlying material. In addition to work on walls, Farto has series of subtractive portraits done by tearing away portions of billboards and posters, as well as in metal and wood.

The New Oriental Warehouse.


The historic Oriental Warehouse Loft Building sits nestled within San Francisco’s south beach neighborhood. Leave it to local architecture team Edmonds & Lee to spearhead a complete reconfiguration and renovation of the space. The team explained, “in order to maximize the spatial experience of the loft, traditional notions of domestic privacy were abandoned in favor of open and transparent relationships.”

Edmonds & Lee brought their concept to fruition by replacing opaque guardrails at the sleeping mezzanine with transparent glass rails, providing a direct visual connection to the space below. Edmonds & Lee also let the bathroom breathe by using an oversized sheet of transparent glass at the restroom instead of a closed off wall, allowing minimal privacy in order to maintain the open and lofty atmosphere.  The original shell of the space was compromised of heavy timbers and rustic old bricks.

The architecture team added modern and sleek new fixtures in the restroom and kitchen areas, and a new cantilevered steel staircase, which leading to the sleeping quarters. New age elements were added to the design of the space including a set of spherical reflective lights hanging over the living room, gallery style canvas art hanging from the walls, and polished oak wood floors to contrast the existing timbers.

The Yellow Brick House.


This residence in the Pavilniai Regional Park, near the Lithuanian capital of Vilnius, is one of those that we just have to point out, although it is neither brand-new nor unfamiliar to many readers.  The confident combination of history and modern needs of an upscale family was achieved by the architectural firm G. Natkevicius & Partners.  Located by in the valley of river Vilnia that gave the city its name, the park and the city have a rich history with the oldest written records dating back to 1323.

The Puckoriu escarpment in the park has rare rock formations from the Ice Age. A large munitions factory on the site dates back to the 17th century.  It seems that in Vilnius private residents can buy pieces of such storied land, and when the current owner of the site – a banker and collector of antique books – bought it, a single bright-yellow building stood on it. On further examination, the owners found out that the building was part of the cannon foundry and it was built of valuable, historic Vilnius-made bricks.

The yellow house itself was not as big as the four-member family wanted their home to be, so they decided to build their new home of glass and erect it around the historic brick house. The exposed brick adds a tactile sexy feel and softens the potentially cold atmosphere of the glass structure. A sensuous curved opening, cut for the staircase that is outside the brick house, adds another focal point that works beautifully with the square elements around it.

The owners’ antique library is now in the basement of the old brick house, the kids’ rooms are on the ground floor, the master bedroom on the top floor. The other functions – living, dining, cooking, baths, garages – are all within the new glass structure. As a stunning bonus to the historically sensitive solution, the residents enjoy an amazing 360-degree view of the park. Sigh.