Posts Tagged ‘ Sculpture ’

Metal Mosaics.


At the heart of Matt Small’s practice is the idea that “there’s always potential within everything.” The British artist gravitates toward an overarching theme of disregard in both subject matter and material, choosing oxidized hunks of iron, bits of patinaed copper, and crinkled aluminum strips that have been relegated to the trash to construct his metallic portraits.  Expressive and emotionally charged, the corroded mosaics link rampant overconsumption and widespread tendencies to throw away what’s deemed obsolete or undesirable to the ways adolescents are marginalized and subsequently not seen as viable members of society. “Because of the social backgrounds they come from, young people find themselves overlooked, disregarded, and left uninvested in,” the artist says. “Marrying the discarded item and painting a portrait of a young person on it or utilizing the material to construct a mosaic face, I hope that the viewer sees that everybody and everything has a right to be viewed as valuable and of worth. It’s just up to us to see that.”  In a conversation with Colossal, Small references Marcel Duchamp’s urinal and the way that readymade sculpture upended long-standing notions of worth as a foundational concept he draws on his own practice. 

By turning debris and seemingly useless materials into works of significance, he hopes to prompt questions about the arbitrary values assigned to objects and people alike, explaining:  The scrap metal has worth because of what I did with it, not because I say it is of worth. The rusted tin can becomes a tone in the face. The shiny metal brings out a highlight on the forehead. All these worthless items have been incorporated into something that someone may now appreciate, and the potential of this scrap item can now be realized.  Small, who lives in his hometown of Camden, currently has work on view as part of Vanguard, which is considering the role of Bristol-area artists who’ve had an outsized impact on British street art since the 1980s. The extensive exhibition, which includes memorabilia and dozens of originals works, is open at M Shed through October 31. If you’re in London, watch for a large-scale mural portrait of the young British entrepreneur Jamal Edwards that Small is working on in Acton, and follow the artist on Instagram to stay up to date with his latest projects.

‘Unbounded’… Who Thought Scaffolding Could Be This Cool?


Ben Butler is fascinated by the complex structures that emerge from simple and delicate processes. This phenomenon can be found in the elaborate systems produced by ant colonies to human cities, small quotidian actions accumulating into overpowering structures. Unbounded, Butler’s installation on display at Rice University Gallery in Houston, Texas, uses this same idea by assembling over 10,000 pieces of poplar wood into a matrix-like structure. This massive arrangement coalesces into an unexpectedly mesmerizing array of grids that stretch to fill the gallery space. Butler approached this installation, as he commonly does within his practice, without initial sketches or ideas of what he would like the structure to look like. He played with the materials, discovering configurations on the spot.

Although the grids within Unbounded were pre-made in his studio, the way they were configured and connected horizontally was all in response to the space. This way of acting in the present ensured that the structure’s outcome would be organic, and not purely responding to a preconceived shape.  Poplar wood was chosen for the installation because of its malleability and abundance, which gave Butler the ability to fiddle with a material that seemed endless. This idea of endlessness also tied into the title he chose for the piece. Butler wanted the piece to have no defined boundary or vantage point, but encourage the audience to walk around and within the structure, discovering it from all angles.

How To Hang A Maze.


Brazillian artist Ernesto Neto is known for his enormous, fiber-based installations that plunge viewers into a multi-sensory landscape of organic elements: people are encouraged to walk through canals of stretched yarn and grasp the structural weavings, while spicy scents like turmeric and cumin are often diffused throughout the room. Similarly immersive and imposing, Neto’s latest work at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston is one of his largest to date. “SunForceOceanLife” is a hand-crocheted, walkable maze of yellow, orange, and green threads that stretch 79 feet across the gallery and spiral 12 feet in the air. The pliable installation centers around “fire, the vital energy that enables life on this planet,” the artist says, sharing that each polymer string utilized is burned at the end to further infuse the piece with sacred, meditative rituals. “I hope that the experience of this work will feel like a chant made in gratitude to the gigantic ball of fire we call the sun, a gesture of thanks for the energy, truth, and power that it shares with us as it touches our land, our oceans, and our life,” he writes.

Plastic balls also fill the pathway and shift underfoot, which forces those passing through the suspended structure to intentionally maintain their balance. Neto explains:

It directly engages the body as does a joyful dance or meditation, inviting us to relax, breathe, and uncouple our body from our conscious mind. The sensation of floating, the body cradled by the crocheted fruits of our labor, brings to mind a hammock: the quintessential indigenous invention that uplifts us and connects us to the wisdom and traditions of our ancestors.

“SunForceOceanLife” is on view at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston through September 26, 2021. You can see more of Neto’s interactive, site-specific projects at Galerie Max Hetzler. (via designboom)

Porcelain Vase Transformed Into An Intricate Dragon Sculpture


 With a porcelain pot, patience, and heaps of talent, Chinese artist Johnson Tsang was able to express “how he felt about his country”. Following in the footsteps of other great pottery artists, Tsang showcased the true beauty of his process by taking step-by-step pictures until the final product is revealed. Impressive, to say the least. Check the method below!






















There’s A New Reason To Recycle… Art.


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Once you’re done drinking out of an aluminum can, there isn’t much left to do but recycle it. Not for Japanese artist Makaon, though. He takes these would-be discarded cans and turns them into sculptures featuring characters from popular culture. We see the Super Mario Brothers, Batman, Pikachu, and even Buzz Lightyear crafted out of the various colorful packaging.

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To construct these works, Makaon takes small pieces of the aluminum and bends it to form the shapes that he wants. Any given sculpture might have two or three different brands of drinks depending on their color. Coca Cola provides Mario with a bright red hat while Carlsberg Beer gives Yoshi his green sheen. Makaon has also managed to find a label that includes a peachy skin tone in its design, meaning that he can accurately depict the human faces. Each character is angular in shape with a rigid-looking build. But, this doesn’t stop them from feeling like a fun and energetic tribute to the pop culture icons that we know and love.

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via MyModernMet

Modern Day Mythological Statues.


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The ancient Greek sculptures of gods, leaders, heroes, and athletes of old, still resonate in our minds as being just a little larger than life (regardless of their actual size).  I’ve always wondered what a modern interpretation of those same ever-powerful images would look like, and this collection pretty much sums it up.  Featured below is a collaboration between southern California based advertising photographer Tim Tadder and Paris based digital artist Cristian Girotto. After seeing Cristian’s work with fashion skin retouching on behance, Tim reached out with a new concept for the talented artist’s technique. Quite simply Tim had the desire to recreate some of the most classic athlete statues from antiquity and with Cristian’s glass/porcelain skin type overlay he new the series would be strikingly unique.

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‘Timepiece’ A Modern-Day Mechanical Sundial


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British artist Conrad Shawcross has turned the London roundhouse into a real-time clock. The installation, ‘timepiece’ is a modern-day mechanical sundial, which transforms the entire room into a time telling system, responding to the circular architecture in a dramatic display of light and shadow. The 8-meter, faceless clock functions from a rotating metal mechanism which hangs from the center of the ceiling. Its three mechanical arms, each with a glaringly bright bulb attached to its end, rhythmically swing and fold. positioned on the floor, marking the center point of the space, is a four-meter high gnomon — the pointed needle of a sundial —  which signals the time. As the illuminated motor whirls, the light it casts onto the ground marks the hours, minutes and seconds in real time. shawcross developed the idea behind the mechanical light sculpture with the realization that he could adopt the roundhouse’s architectural elements into a timekeeper, paralleling its 24 iron columns to the number of hours in the day. The chiaroscuro that defines the piece brings the idea of timekeeping back to the participatory, celestial experience it once was.

Stunning Sculptures by Tom Eckert


12 01 02 03When we’re talking about wooden sculptures the first things came in mind is figures of people, animals, fruits etc. But American sculptor Tom Eckert breaks stereotypes. Tom Eckert received his M.F.A. degree from Arizona State University, with advanced study at California State University at Northridge. He uses a wide variety of woodworking techniques in his sculptural pieces, including laminating, bending, carving, turning and painting.

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The World Turns Sculpture by Michael Parekowhai


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New Zealand sculptor Michael Parekowhai’s installation titled “The World Turns” is an intriguing piece of work that features an enormous bronze statue of an elephant balancing on its head. Next to the 5-meter-tall structure, there is a tiny, almost undetectable, figure of a kuril (a rodent native to Australia, often referred to as a “water rat”) and a short distance away there is a chair installed for viewers to take a seat and reflect on the statue. In a statement, the museum says, “The World Turns reminds us that history is often recorded to highlight specific moments, but, as the world turns, there are many other stories – and these are central to our understanding of history.”

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Jonty Hurwitz – Anamorphic Sculptures


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When art meets mathematics, it can gives some quite amazing projects. And thats how these anamorphic sculptures were created. Conceived by London artist Jonty Hurwitz, these sculpture look pretty much like nothing you can imagine. But when you look at them through the reflection of a cylinder, you discover great pieces of art forming hands, objects & animals.

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World’s Biggest Sculpture To Be Built In Abu Dhabi


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Christo, the legendary public artist famous for his Wrapped Reichstag, plans to build the world’s largest sculpture out of oil drums in Abu Dhabi. “The Mastaba” is a pyramid-like structure made entirely from stacked, painted oil barrels, designed to tower above the sand dunes of the Gulf desert. It will take 30 months and hundreds of people to build the sculpture, which will be placed 100 miles outside Abu Dhabi in Al Gharbia. Although Christos said the idea for the sculpture was put together more than 30 years ago, conflict in the region prevented the piece from receiving approval. Christo is reportedly working with the crown prince’s elder brother, Sheikh Hamdan bin Zayed al-Nayhan to built the project. If completed, the $340 million project will be the largest permanent structure in the world–and the priciest.

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Lexus Sculpture – CT Umbra.


Lexus has taken its fifth hybrid, the compact CT 200h, on the road in more forms than one. This eerie and artistic sculpture, titled CT Umbra, was part of the Lexus debate series tour called Darker side of Green. Created by Los Angeles-based Nondesign, the installation aimed to highlight the two seemingly opposing features of the vehicle – luxury and eco-friendliness – by changing colors from luxurious gold to earthy green and blue. This contradiction was also the underlying question during the debates. The sculpture is based on a map of vertical lines created from the CAD model of CT 200h. It was built of 2,500 half-inch anodized aluminum bars cut to the exact measurements of the map. Lexus introduced the debate concept in March with a celebrity-attended press event at Skylight West in New York just before the car’s launch at the New York International Auto Show.

Makoto Tojiki’s Light Sculptures.


Japanese artist Makoto Tojikil is fascinated by light. He uses it in ways that create amazing illusions and out-of-this-world experiences in a subtle, inquisitive way. These pieces are known as “No Shadow”. As you can see these large animals and human sculptures are made of strands of light  that seem to evoke a sense of playfulness, awe, possibility and wonder.

Kinetic Sculpture from BMW


Company BMW in conjunction with the design studio ART+COM decided to expand our understanding of “sculpture” and presented to the audience something unbelievable – “Kinetic Sculpture” created from numerous small metal balls floating in the air and grouping into various forms. It consists of exactly 714 metal spheres connected with a thin steel wires. Each wire in its turn is connected with an individual motor, which causes the ball in motion. Wires holding the ball are almost invisible, and it seems that spheres are floating in the air by themselves! Eyewitnesses say that’s unforgettable spectacle. Initially balls move randomly, and then begin to group into forms in which can be guessed shapes of BMW cars of various years: BMW 327, BMW 1500, BMW Z4 coupe concept and Mille Miglia.

Another Set Of Examples Of Brilliant Street Art.


Street art is honestly by far my favorite medium for visually expressing ideas.  It literally comes in all different forms, and can inspire, scare, bewilder, warn, and make people laugh.  This is probably my 9th or 10th street art collection on this blog in the last 2 years.  So although I think one or two photos may have been repeated in previous posts, check out all these incredibly interesting pieces of street art.

Be Your Own Souvenir.


So you’re at the museum, and deep down in the sub-basement right next to the restrooms you happen to discover an enormous machine that looks like it was pulled from the Aliens II movie set. And then you notice you can insert a dollar, and suddenly the machine whirs to life and pipes hot, neon green plasticine into a mold in front of your very eyes as you inahale noxious fumes. Within moments you’re in the possession of a bona-fide neon green submarine, a memento of your visit to the museum that smells strange for days. Be Your Own Souvenir by Barcelona-based blablabLAB is just like that, except a trillion times more awesome. Using custom software developed using openFrameworks and openKinect, visitors film themselves in front of 3 kinect sensors for a full 360-degree scan and within moments a 3D printer known as a RepRap machine spits out a little army guy version of themselves. Every museum in the world should have one of these in their sub-basement, though they can probably install this by the front door.

Billie Achilleos X Louis Vuitton.


In celebrating the 25th anniversary of luxury brand Louis Vuitton being present in Australia, the high-profile company is opening a new flagship store Down Under. Not just a retail shop, however, the location will account for yet another Louis Vuitton Maison, of which can also be found in New York, London, Tokyo and Paris. To heighten the overall brand experience, the Australian destination will feature highly intriguing creations by artist Billie Achilleos, including a variety of native creatures, decked out in Louis Vuitton.

The Kiki De Montparnasse Chess Set.


Kiki de Montparnasse and aruliden have collaborated in the creation of a uniquely luxurious chess set that combines strategy and sensuality.  The exquisite set is made of the highest quality materials. Thirty-two individual pieces with matte and gloss finishes hold court on a handmade walnut game board.  Each playing piece has a hidden function.

What if I tell you that the pieces are actually vibrating?  This chess set is a uniquely luxurious product, reminding us that truly fulfilling intimate experiences are enhanced and designed with in the mind.  Priced at $10,000 if you playing for money, you BETTER win.

The Skull Nickles.


The term “Hobo Nickel” describes any small-denomination coin (though, normally soft nickels) that people carve to create miniature reliefs of…well, all sorts of things. It started sometime in the 18th century but continues to this day; There’s even an entire society dedicated to the art of nickel carving…  This all sounds stimulating, I know, but have a little faith. As with all types of art, something that seems simple in explanation is made beautiful and complicated in the hands of right artists. Check out a few of these “Skull Nickels“, a very surface view of just what carvers do with these “Hobo Nickels“.

The Auto-Ink Machine.


Chris Eckert (San Jose, California) the artist who created the Auto-Ink machine must be a very trusting guy.  One of the first things someone said when we came across the pictures of this machine was “I don’t trust it.”, and it does look a bit odd.  But after seeing the video below and reading about the basis of the machine, I did have a bit more ‘faith’.

Auto Ink is a three axis numerically controlled sculpture. Once the main switch is triggered, the operator is assigned a religion and it’s corresponding symbol is tattooed onto the person’s arm. The operator does not have control over the assigned symbol. It is assigned either randomly or through divine intervention, depending on your personal beliefs.

Luckily right now it’s set up with a pen, not a real tattoo gun.

Amazing Paint-Spill Painting.


Paintings can take many different shapes and styles, but spill paintings are among some of the oddest.  This unique style of painting simply involves dripping large amounts of paint onto a structure, and watching the natural flow of the paint create the rest.  Check out a video of this amazing art form below.