Posts Tagged ‘ Pictuers ’

You’d Never Believe Airlines Look Like This…


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Why is the main course in our in-flight meal usually swimming in sauce? And why is there never enough leg room in economy class? These, and other more serious questions regarding modern day air travel are just some of the questions addressed in a recent book from Laurence King Publishing titled ‘Airline: Style at 30,000 Feet’, written by designer and author Keith Lovegrove. Published in August 2013 as a second, ‘mini’ edition of an older title dating back to 2000, the book sets out to ”illustrate and analyse the successful – and occasionally not so successful – results of the airlines’ relentless quest to vie for attention.” Written honestly and eloquently with a healthy dose of humour, ‘Airline’ is peppered with personal accounts of travelling experiences and anecdotes. Providing an engaging if not rather causal overview of airline travel, the book describes the evolution of airline-related design in four chapters that focus on fashion, interiors, food and branding. Along with the history of commercial aviation, Lovegrove also comments on air travel from a cultural, technical and social point of view, thus putting the whole subject into a wider perspective.

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Need A Secret Norwegian Submarine Base?


Looking for somewhere to store your submarine? The Royal Norwegian Navy has put up a secret, mountainside submarine base for sale…  Construction of the Olavsvern Naval Base, just outside the city of Tromso, took more than thirty years, with construction starting in 1964 and not finishing until after 1994.  Listed for $17.5 million, Olavsvern Naval Base comes complete with a submarine dry dock, a tunnel system, an emergency power system, 145,000 square feet of surface buildings, and a 27,000-square-foot “alpine resort.”  Despite the relatively cut price cost of the base, deep pockets will be needed to meet the base’s rumored annual electricity bill of more than $1million.

A$AP Rocky’s London Melee.


Rapper generally have a preconceived notion following them that they’re rough, tough, and aren’t to be messed with.  Weather an artists persona dictates that they should act aggressive or not… as a human being, anyone gets pissed off when someone steals your stuff.    When Asap Rocky got his $15,000 watch stolen in London at Camden Electric Ballroom concert, it wasn’t an act, the man was generally upset… See what happens when you steal Asap’s watch.

Rihanna Nude.


Rihanna isn’t known for covering up, so it’s no surprise that she dared to bare it all in new behind-the-scenes photos from a shoot for her upcoming fragrance, which is appropriately titled Nude.  The singer’s pal Melissa Forde posted the sexy pics on Instagram with the caption, “#Nude Behind the scenes for new fragrance photo shoot.” In the photos, Rihanna poses topless, donning a blond wig for several seductive photos.  Nude will be Rihanna’s third fragrance. She released Reb’l Fleur in spring 2011 and Rebelle in December.

Hengki Koentjoro – Misty For Me.


Take a look at some of these amazing images from Hengki Koentjoro, in a gallery titled “Play Misty For Me”.

Water Art.


The shapes displayed in Luka Klikovac’s work look like colored smoke, or maybe strange deep-sea creatures, but they’re actually mixtures of colored and black liquids immersed in water. The Serbian photographer’s photo series is called Demersaland was based on the unique motions resulting from the combination of fluids.  (I can’t write that without feeling dirty.)

To create this psychedelic effect, the photographer used nothing but his camera and lights capable of showing the dance of fluid shapes captured by his lenses. No digital editing resources were used afterwards, so what you see in the images are actually the precise moments when the two elements were combined.

Klikovac said that the goal of his work is to create images that allow people to escape from their daily routine and that his underwater shapes should be interpreted like the Rorschach inkblot test. What do you see in them?

Henrique Oliveira’s Plywood Sculptures.


It’s difficult to imagine the equating of weathered construction plywood with a painter’s brush stroke, but that what Brazilian artist Henrique Oliveira does with his impressive three-dimensional sculptures made entirely out of layers upon layers of pieces of peeled, old plywood, collected from various construction sites around Sao Paulo.  Originally a painter, Oliveira began making his sculptures (some of which look something like gigantic roots bursting into a room) after spying an old, peeling wooden fence outside of his studio. He intuitively saw the peeling strips of wood as something similar to that of a brushstroke laid down by a painter’s hand, and since then, has worked with aged plywood in this way, much like a painter would colour a canvas.  To make his sculptures, which range from the enormous to smaller pieces, he gathers plywood strips of all shapes and sizes, before layering them into forms that are sometimes also painted over, in order to give an illusion of uniform smoothness.

To make his sculptures, which range from the enormous to smaller pieces, he gathers plywood strips of all shapes and sizes, before layering them into forms that are sometimes also painted over, in order to give an illusion of uniform smoothness.  Plywood is an inexpensive and abundant material for fencing, and instead of leaving old fences to crumble, Oliveira transforms the linearity of such a humble material into mind-boggling and eye-catching spaces, punctuated by tendrils or mounds of almost-living forms. Other times, Oliveira creates cavernous canyons out of this salvaged material, ones that visitors can inhabit.  It’s an ingenious way to reuse a product that’s been broken down so much beyond the point of utility; instead of sawdust, art is created. For the curious, there’s many more impressive images on Henrique Oliveira’s website.