Posts Tagged ‘ Translucent ’

Liquid Glacial Table


If you need something creative for your interiro then you should pay attention to this cool table designed by Zaha Hadid. This masterpiece is called the the Liquid Glacial Table. This piece of translucent, clear acrylic that resembles a small glacier, with incredibly beautiful legs that seem to be water vortexes, is truly bespoke and would easily be the focal point of your living room. The designer managed to immortalize two important states of water, ice, as a solid, and water itself as a liquid in this chic and elegant table.

An Invisible Television?


Ask yourself, “what’s the next step in television innovation?” The answer might just be transparency – an invisible flatscreen that blends into the home environment when not in use, much like the Loewe Invisio. This magnificent TV is not a big black blot in standby mode, like how all television sets are. It’s a clear, frameless glass surface that keeps the room in its “visually unaltered” state.

Michael explains,

“As the first of its kind, the Loewe Invisio introduces technical innovation, combining conventional LCD and the latest TOLED display technology. This allows to create non-transparent / solid moving pictures with rich color reproduction and full contrast range from solid black to pristine white.”

Just what my spot needs.  Loewe Invisio is a 2011 iF Concept Design shortlisted design. Winners for the competition will be announced soon.

The Translucent Church.


Gijs Van Vaerenbergh, a collaboration between young Belgian architects Pieterjan Gijs (Leuven, 1983) and Arnout Van Vaerenbergh (Leuven, 1983), have built a see-through church in the Belgian region of Haspengouw. The church is a part of the Z-OUT project of Z33, house for contemporary art based in Hasselt, Belgium. Z-OUT is an ambitious longterm art in public space project that will be realised on different locations in the Flemish region of Limburg over the next five years.  The church is 10 meters high and is made of 100 layers and 2000 columns of steel. Depending on the perspective of the viewer, the church is either perceived as a massive building or seems to dissolve (partly or entirely) in the landscape. On the other hand, looking at the landscape from within the church, the surrounding countryside is redefined by abstract lines.

The design of the church is based on the architecture of the multitude of churches in the region, but through the use of horizontal plates, the concept of the traditional church is transformed into a transparent object of art.  The project is called ‘Reading between the Lines’ and can be read as a reflection on architectural themes such as scale, ground plan etc., but the project also emphatically transcends the strictly architectural. After all, the church does not have a well-defined function and focuses on visual experience in itself (one could even consider it to be a line drawing in space)