Advertisements

Posts Tagged ‘ Technology ’

The Seamless Screen.


The poor bezel, I wonder what it ever did to us to deserve this hatred, but wow… Humans really dislike them. With every smartphone from last year trying hard to kill the bezel, Asus Rog finally designed a hack that does just that, but it isn’t for phones just yet. The Bezel Free Kit fulfills the dreams of gamers, allowing them to put together three monitors and remove the bezels between each WITHOUT using electricity or batteries). How does it do that? Refraction. The kit comes as two independent strips that can be placed between monitors. It uses a lens that ‘bends’ light in a manner that removes the bezel from view, making it look like you have one continuous screen.

The result isn’t perfect, but it’s enough to make a difference. You still notice the fact that there’s something sitting between screens, and it applies a slight blurred effect to the imagery behind it, making it good for games, but not for productivity. The Bezel Free Kit snaps right on to monitors and comes in three sizes, designed for 24″, 25″, and 32″ monitors, but you’ll need to make sure all your monitors are the same make and size, so that the lens strips can easily mount onto the displays. Scroll down to check out a video of the guys at Verge having a look at it. Wouldn’t it be fun though if your smartphone screen protector could refract light to remove your bezels?

Advertisements

Just How Did Star Wars Brought People Back From The Dead?


tarkin-32x_16f7b5db

With Rogue One: A Star Wars Story having been in theatres for a few weeks now, one of the biggest talking points of the film has been the digital resurrection of the late Peter Cushing as Grand Moff Tarkin. While there were plenty of rumors prior to release about the character appearing in the film, the villain ended up having an unexpectedly sizeable role as a secondary antagonist.

Reactions to the use of Cushing’s skeletal visage have ranged from praise over the effects to derision over morality, though the team behind the film maintains that his involvement was imperative to the story, given Tarkin’s position as Commander of the Death Star in Episode IV. “If he’s not in the movie, we’re going to have to explain why he’s not in the movie,” said Lucasfilm story development executive Kiri Hart to the New York Times. “This is kind of his thing.”

263hsmq-jpg

Industrial Light And Magic worked on Tarkin, with permission and input from Cushing’s estate. Actor Guy Henry portrayed the character on set, with his facial performance replaced by a digital recreation of Cushing in the film’s final cut. The team at ILM used archived daily footage from A New Hope to study and simulate the facial tics of Cushing. “When Peter Cushing makes an ‘aah’ sound, he doesn’t move his upper lip,” explained ILM chief creative officer John Knoll. “He only opens his jaw about halfway, and makes this square shape with his lower lip, that exposes his lower teeth.” Before these nuances in Cushing’s face were accounted for, the team felt like their creation resembled a relative of Cushing, and not the actor exactly. However, their first rule was that “realism trumped likeness.”

While ILM was certain they could pull off Tarkin as a fully-realized character in the film, there were back-up plans just in case, though it would have resulted in a significantly reduced on-screen presence for the character. “We did talk about Tarkin participating in conversations via hologram, or transferring that dialogue to other characters,” Knoll said.

25ggp40-jpg

Some of the criticism stemming from the use of Cushing’s likeness in Rogue One was that it opened the door to using the digital appearances of deceased actors in other films. Knoll, however, said he doesn’t see that happening, with Rogue One acting as a special cirumstance. “I don’t imagine that happening,” Knoll said. “This was done for very solid and defendable story reasons. This is a character that is very important to telling this kind of story. It is extremely labor-intensive and expensive to do. I don’t imagine anybody engaging in this kind of thing in a casual manner. We’re not planning on doing this digital re-creation extensively from now on. It just made sense for this particular movie.”

 

via CBM.com

“Dras”tic Cell Phone Changes May Be In Our Future.


drasphone_1 drasphone_5

The Drasphone tries to combine two undeniably massive trends in cellular phone design. The clamshell trend of the 90s, and the present touchscreen display trend. Pioneering flexible display technology, this conceptual smartphone bends at not one, not two, but at three points. This allows you to make the Drasphone compact in two ways. Do a half fold, and you have a Squarish MiniDras, or a complete fold, and you get a MicroDras.

drasphone_7 drasphone_6 drasphone_2

If you haven’t noticed, a small section of the display is exposed when in MicroDras mode. This nifty feature allows you to have all your notifications and relevant data visible to you even when your phone is in sleep mode.  Now while I strongly believe that large moving parts in a smartphone can result in major wear and tear (remember how easy it was to snap a clamshell phone?), I’d love to see a working prototype before I can make any promises.

(via YD)

drasphone_4 drasphone_3

The future a la Mercedes-Benz


“A chill-out zone in the midst of the mega city traffic mayhem,” Mercedes-Benz calls its latest self-driving concept car, the Vision Tokyo — so named because it’s being introduced this week at the Tokyo Motor Show. “Chill-out zone” actually seems fair, because the interior of this smooth, silver bean of technology is an arc-shaped couch, where up to five passengers can, in fact, chill out.

There’s nothing production-ready about the Vision Tokyo — everything from the fuel cell drive train to the futuristic wraparound displays in the interior is a dream of a far-off world, though Mercedes deserves some credit for focusing on a singularly executed theme: all of its concept cars this year, starting with the F 015 at January’s CES, have looked like birds of a feather. Outside, there’s the otherworldly silver paint covering everything, glass included; blue LED accents around the perimeter make the car look like a prop from Tron and communicate the vehicle’s self-driving intentions to nearby pedestrians (another trick borrowed from the F 015).

Autonomous mode is clearly the focus considering the seating layout, but it’s still possible to take control — a “jump seat” unfurls and a steering wheel pops out on command. That’s not very chill, though; members of Generation Z (who Mercedes says the Vision Tokyo is for) want “personal contact whenever possible,” which they can get with the face-to-face arrangement while the car drives itself.

Among the stranger features Mercedes has envisioned here is a hologram projection system for showing apps and maps in three-dimensional space. There’s also a trick windscreen that will show a graphic equalizer — think a music visualizer from back in the Winamp days — whenever the occupants are listening to music. (Not to say you necessarily want the people outside your car to know what you’re listening to, but it’d look cool, at least.) All this is tied to an emissions-free drivetrain that Mercedes says is good for 980 kilometers (609 miles) — 190 kilometers in electric-only mode and another 790 kilometers in the hydrogen fuel cell.

The exterior of the Vision Tokyo is “comparable” to a “mid-series vehicle” in its dimensions. Arguably, even that’s too big for Tokyo, a hyper-dense city where subminiature “Kei cars” are extremely popular. But if you want to fit five people and play with three-dimensional apps, this concept might be your best choice.

Emperor 200 luxury computer workstation


 


This over-the-top looking setup gives you a comfy ergonomic leather seating unit with touch-screen controls, and a view to kill with three computer displays positioned just right for you to lean back and enjoy.

The whole thing is motorized too, so you can adjust the angle of your environment without getting up out of your chair. It’s also got a work surface for a keyboard and mouse, and the monitors can be positioned at a flat eye-level if you want to get some work done.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Solar-Powered Ecocapsule Allows You to Live Off the Grid Anywhere in the World


Slovakia’s  Architects recently revealed several exciting details about the Ecocapsule that will give you the opportunity to live anywhere in the world. Ecocapsule is a micro-shelter that operates off-grid by using sustainable technology such as solar power, rainwater collection and filtration, and wind power. In addition to this environmentally friendly aspect, the structure allows for worldwide flexibility and portability, since it can be easily transported and used as an independent research station, a tourist lodge, an emergency house, or even as a humanitarian-action unit.

Despite measuring only 14.6 feet in length, 7.9 feet in width, and 8.2 feet in height, the Ecocapsule can comfortably fit two adults and provide the same luxuries as a hotel room. A built-in kitchenette, running water, a flushing toilet, and a hot shower are now comforts that can be taken into the wilderness. For those that want to use this egg-shaped structure for scientific research, there is plenty of storage space for equipment and any necessary technology. When transporting this capsule, no special preparations are needed, since it can be shipped, airlifted, or even pulled by an animal.  

 

On May 28th, the Ecocapsule will be unveiled at the Pioneers Festival in Vienna and more details will be released then. By the end of this year, this innovative structure will be made available for purchase. 

Revolutionary Robotic Camera Drone Pilots Itself While Following You


If you live in San Francisco, chances are you have seen several drones flying around, especially in the Presidio. Even though they are still debatable, drones are being used more and more. So why not use one that pilots itself while following you around? For years, we’ve taken gorgeous photos using “point and shoot” style cameras, but the team at Lily is shaking things up. Their recent innovation of the same name takes this idea a step further with “throw and shoot” photography. Lily is an ultra-compact robotic camera drone, and it allows you to capture aerial photos and videos without having to pilot it.

To use the camera drone, you simply throw it in air and it begins shooting. Lily flies itself at speeds of up to 25 miles per hour, using a combination of GPS and computer vision to follow you around. The kit comes with a tracking device that has a wrist case.

Lily is built for photographing your outdoor adventures. It’s waterproof, floats, and can land on water. Size-wise, the drone fits easily into a backpack and weighs less than three pounds. The camera can shoot 12 megapixel still images, 1080p HD video, and 720p of slow-motion footage. Its flight time lasts 20 minutes with the built-in Lithium-Ion battery.

It will start shipping in February 2016 and is priced at $999. But, until June 15, the company is taking pre-orders through its website for $499.

Advertisements
Advertisements