Posts Tagged ‘ New Zealand ’

The World Turns Sculpture by Michael Parekowhai


Michael Parekowhai "The World Turns"

New Zealand sculptor Michael Parekowhai’s installation titled “The World Turns” is an intriguing piece of work that features an enormous bronze statue of an elephant balancing on its head. Next to the 5-meter-tall structure, there is a tiny, almost undetectable, figure of a kuril (a rodent native to Australia, often referred to as a “water rat”) and a short distance away there is a chair installed for viewers to take a seat and reflect on the statue. In a statement, the museum says, “The World Turns reminds us that history is often recorded to highlight specific moments, but, as the world turns, there are many other stories – and these are central to our understanding of history.”

Michael Parekowhai "The World Turns" Michael Parekowhai "The World Turns" Michael Parekowhai "The World Turns"

Jeremy Young


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He’s only 17 and already has great qualities when it comes to put his talent to work. Jeremy Young comes from New Zealand and has his very own style. It’s all about colors, and minimalism, drawing portraits with his own touch.

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Fall-Off Table by Sam Stringleman


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This interesting design concept was created by industrial designer from New Zealand Sam Stringleman. Fall Off is a computer generated table in which surface density is defined by the placement of objects on a virtual table through a web interface. As a virtual object, for example a laptop or coffee cup, is moved around on the table, the epicenter of the structure follows. This forms supporting density on the top surface and structural form on the underside which accommodates splayed legs. The surrounding density is controllable through a digital falloff, representing a gradual decrease. With the addition of more objects the density increases to a state of equilibrium with just enough structure to perform the required task but move it and it will Fall off.

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Mike Hewson’s Public Installations.


In Christchurch, New Zealand, 10 massive optical illusion-inducing mixed-media art pieces by Mike Hewson pay homage to the former Christchurch Normal School which opened in 1876.  The building, completely renovated for apartment and retail use in 1981 and renamed Cranmer Courts, was damaged badly in the February 2012 magnitude 6.3 earthquake and it is now destined for demolition. Before it is gone forever, Hewson wanted to pay homage to the building that used to house a vibrant community.

He covered the total of 130 square meters of plywood with mixed-media images depicting artists and others who lived and worked in the building.  Private donations and Hewson’s own money covered the $15,000 installation costs. New Zealand-born (in 1985) Mike Hewson is a civil engineer, graduate of Canterbury University (2007). He has worked as a civil engineer in Port Hedland in Western Australia, but has travelled regularly to New Zealand to complete works of art there. He will move permanently back to New Zealand next month and focus on his art full time.

The Korora House.


On a remote ridge stretching between the Hauraki Gulf and the breathtaking landscape of Waiheke Island sits the Korora House, Daniel Marshall Architect’s latest project. The New Zealand based firms’ driving approach to building the Korora House was to “work within the contour of the ridge, as an attempt to minimize the impact on the landscape.” The team was successful at their approach, co as each element of the house fits tightly within the curves of the rolling hills.  Marshall was extremely methodical when he incorporated local weather conditions into the design of the home. “The plan form of the house is spaced between two courtyards, which are bridged by a gabled roof stretched across the long axis. The courtyards provide the opportunity to shelter from either of the two dominant winds.”  Korora is built with materials of local interest, Marshall explains that “the materiality of the house draws on two architectural conditions of Waiheke, the masonry forms were inspired by the gun emplacements of Stoney Batter. The use of cedar and plywood reflect precarious weekenders of the island’s past. The combination of the home’s materials and it’s intricate built are what make the Korora House absolutely beautiful.

Lupe Fiasco Talks ‘Lasers’


Check out this recent interview with Lupe Fiasco, discussing his new album “Lasers” with ONE News out of New Zealand.