Posts Tagged ‘ Figures ’

Stunning Sculptures by Tom Eckert


12 01 02 03When we’re talking about wooden sculptures the first things came in mind is figures of people, animals, fruits etc. But American sculptor Tom Eckert breaks stereotypes. Tom Eckert received his M.F.A. degree from Arizona State University, with advanced study at California State University at Northridge. He uses a wide variety of woodworking techniques in his sculptural pieces, including laminating, bending, carving, turning and painting.

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Skin Deep


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Paris based photographer Julien Palast knows how to showcase the human body in a particular way. What’s interesting about this series is that despite basically shrink-wrapping and hiding the human forms, you actually become more aware of them. The contours and curves of the female and male figures are slickly highlighted by the well-selected material—a gradiented array of vibrantly tropical colors and just enough sheen in all the right places.

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Attack of the Shadow People


I recently got the chance to peep some insane artwork from the very talented Japanese artist Kumi Yamashita.  Kumi uses small metal objects and the percise positioning of light to create her pieces.

 “Since I was a child I had always been drawn to the beauty in nature. It is complete yet ephemeral and does not require an explanation. Like a warm yellow afternoon light or magnolia flowers glowing under the moonlight. I drew and painted light and shadow that I saw in nature until one day I realized that I could use a real light instead.”

“In my work I find shadow to be the essence of human being and of everything else in the world that most of us don’t recognize. Once at my exhibition an old man stood in front of one of the artwork for a long time. Suddenly he jumped back in shock as he recognized the silhouette of a woman that he didn’t see until now. It made me laugh but at same time I realized how oblivious we all can be. How much we are missing in our lives because of that. In my work object and shadow are equally important. They reveal many faces of reality. Separated objects can be connected in shadow. It shows me that we all are connected and share the same essence. But mostly, I’m drawn to its ephemeral beauty.”Kumi Yamashita