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Posts Tagged ‘ Desk ’

The Cemtrex “Smart Desk”?


It is quite true.  This desk has some fancy features.  Cemtrex SmartDesk is your work and office completely reinvented. This advanced workstation combines and reimagines all the needs of the modern office in a beautiful, intuitive sit/stand desk.  Check out more details below.

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Torque Desk by I M Lab


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London-based Alessandro Isola & Supriya Mankad from I M Lab have designed the Torque Desk.  A twisting take on a traditionally formal product. In this instance the desk has been transformed into a dynamic spatial object in tension with the straight walls of the space it occupies. The tensile stresses require the desk to be constructed in a malleable and ductile material. Bringing together clever engineering and hand craftsmanship, all the components of the metal body are structural as well as functional. The flat plane of the desk is folded to support itself at one end while seemingly resting on a stack of drawers at the other end. The rotating drawers are cantilevered around the spine which performs multiple functions of a support, a pivot and a cable management system connecting a floor point all the way up to the desk surface. An malachite letter and pen holder completes the design.

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Fall-Off Table by Sam Stringleman


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This interesting design concept was created by industrial designer from New Zealand Sam Stringleman. Fall Off is a computer generated table in which surface density is defined by the placement of objects on a virtual table through a web interface. As a virtual object, for example a laptop or coffee cup, is moved around on the table, the epicenter of the structure follows. This forms supporting density on the top surface and structural form on the underside which accommodates splayed legs. The surrounding density is controllable through a digital falloff, representing a gradual decrease. With the addition of more objects the density increases to a state of equilibrium with just enough structure to perform the required task but move it and it will Fall off.

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Chelsea Workspace.


Many of us know what it’s like to work from home. Distraction upon distraction tends to stunt our productiveness. If only more of us could convince our employers that we can, in fact, stay motivated and actually get work accomplished in the confines of our own home offices.  The design team at Synthesis recently installed Chelsea Workspace that is a custom home office for a private personal investment advisor. Constrained by both budget and space, the design team at Synthesis enwrapped a series of prefabricated CNC milled birch plywood ribs atop all the necessary features any home workspace should include: a desk, sliding and hinged storage units, a printer and paper shredder, concealed paths for wires and cables and  recesses for lighting – thereby eliminating all unnecessary clutter.  One small window emits natural light onto the surfaces where horizontal spacers are arranged in the pattern of a world map, which will allow the owner to map out his travels. The design of the work space presents a viable solution to ensure working from home can be free from distraction, and where focus in an innovative space ensures the highest level of productivity.

The Mercedes-Benz Furniture Collection.


A while back I reported on a furniture collection by Aston Martin.  Since then it seems like another car company has jumped on the same train.  The new furniture collection by Mercedes-Benz Style will be making its world debut during Milan’s “design week” with a special Fuorisalone event.  The collection is made and distributed worldwide by Formitalia Luxury Group and brings the reality of research and material quality that is inherent in Mercedes automotive products into the home.  The presentation will take place from 16th April till 21st April 2012 at Mercedes-Benz Milano S.p.A., Via Daimler, 1 – 20151 Milano.

The Secret Stashes of Yiting Cheng.


The title of this post may seem like the name of some whimsical children’s book, but its quite the contrary.  Designer Yiting Cheng must live around some pretty shifty folks to come up with some of the techniques for hiding everyday objects.  From desks, to glasses of milk, to book shelves, Cheng has designed a series of everyday objects that you can use to hide things in plain sight.  Very useful if you spend time around people who love to snoop through your stuff.

 

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