Posts Tagged ‘ Demonstration ’

When’s The Last Time You Saw Photos Like This?


Young Woman Dimly Lit with Closed Eyes Young Woman covered in multicolored lights Young Woman's Face Covered by Flowers Woman Covered by Futuristic Patterns of Light Woman in Abstract Lighting Looking to the SiteThe concept of projecting images onto a screen or a subject may not necessarily be a brand new way to create incredibly imagery, but Gem Fletcher, and Mads Perch have elevated things to a new level.  Their incredible collaboration gallery titled ‘Moving Time’ is visually stunning, and a masterpiece of concept and photography.  Check the method.

Young man Covered by Abstract Patterns of Light Young Woman with Multicolored Light in her Face Young Woman Covered by futuristic Lines of Lights Young Man with Abstract Lights Young Woman and the Univers

How About A Solar Powered DJ Booth In Your Local Park.


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Have you ever found yourself wandering through a suburban park and wondering “this experience would be better with music”?  Well, your prayers may about to be answered, as Dutch sports company Yalp have developed a solar-powered DJ booth that is popping up in parks all over the place. Denmark, Finland, the Netherlands and Australia are the early adopters, and the booth has been positioned in public, absolutely free spots for anyone to wander up and start jamming their favorite tunes.

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It’s a simple enough device – you bring your mobile device and rest it on a special pad, which picks up the musical output without any wires (seriously, it’s like magic). Then you can muck around with the various effects (bitcrusher, delay, pitch shift etc) using the platters as controllers, and crossfade as necessary. Obviously if you wanna get the most out of it as an amateur DJ then you’ll need two devices, but we reckon that collaboration is being encouraged here.  One thing that does seem a bit iffy to us though is that with your phone sitting on the booth, relatively unguarded, how long will it last before someone snatches it? They are in public parks, after all.

 

Feel The Rainbow.


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Artist Gabriel Dawe is showing his incredible new installation that just opened to the public last October 6 in Como, Italy. As part of Miniartextil, an annual exhibition of contemporary art, Dawe created Plexus no. 19, a stunning thread installation that’s beautifully spread across two balconies in the atrium of a historic villa. The early 19th century neoclassic house, called Villa Olmo, was acquired in 1924 by the municipality of Como and is now open to the public only during cultural events and art exhibitions like this.

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This year’s Miniartextil exhibition is called Agora, taking from the Greek word that describes an important public place where people come to share ideas. The visitor is invited to not just look at the artwork but to be actively involved in it.Plexus no. 19 consists of two thread structures streamed across an upper and lower balcony that is meant to be experienced from different angles or at different times of the day. As Dawe tells us, “When the sun comes in in the morning, it is fantastic. Having those window-shaped light beams add a dimension to the installation. I always like when I get direct sunshine on them because it emphasizes the layering of the thread in very interesting ways.”

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With two assistants, Dawe constructed this installation in about a week. His greatest challenge was working to the confines of the space. “Because of the historic nature of the building, I wasn’t able to touch ceiling, walls or floors to screw in my structures,” he says. “So I resorted to fixing them to the railings, which in great measure restricted what I was able to do. In the end, it worked out pretty well; it really exceeded my expectations how well the installation inhabits the space.” – via Chiccquero

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DJ’s Eye View.


In a mesmerizing point-of-view video, DJ Angelo demonstrates the intricate process of blending tracks from seven vinyl records. “Turntablism” was coined, apparently, to distinguish between a DJ who simply plays full records and a DJ who manipulates their sounds in various ways. It’s pretty amazing to see the various elements of the track come together over time, so make sure to watch full screen, with the sound up.

Augmented Reality Glasses. (For Real).


At CES got to see some new Android smartphones, tablets, and TVs, but there were quite a large amount of awesome accessories. One company I definitely saw a stunner from was Vuzix, who unveiled their SMART Glasses Technology. High prices and bulky designs have slowed the adoption of wearable displays among the average consumer, but Vuzix hopes to change that with their latest products.

Thanks to internal developments and a recent licensing relationship with Nokia Corporation, Vuzix was able to produce a 1.4 mm thick polymer waveguide lens that fits into the temples & lenses of a conventional pair of eyewear. The new glasses are designed to work with connected devices like smartphones and allow the user to watch big screen movies or interact with augmented reality apps.

The current STAR 1200 glasses from Vuzix retail for $4,999, so hopefully they can bring the price down quite a bit and bring their wearable displays from today’s battlefield to the average consumer. Check out the video below for an idea of what see-through augmented reality can do.

Stuffed With The Paper Cuts.


Jen Stark uses piles of paper and than cuts them to reveal colored layers.  This is by far one of the most interesting style’s I’ve ever come across.

The Google X Augmented Reality Glasses.


The existence of Google X was first disclosed late last year and reports that the researchers there were exploring augmented reality surfaced in February.  This is the first time Google has officially acknowledged this particular project.  Writing for the New York Times, Nick Bilton notes that Babak Parviz is known for creating contact lenses embedded with electronics, which suggests that Google’s augmented reality might be available in a form factor smaller than sunglasses at some point.

Google has posted a video on YouTube that explores how the glasses might work. The scenes shown are not actual production footage of the glasses in the field. They’re augmented with post-production graphics that show how Project Glass might work. But the video conveys what Google hopes to achieve: a seamless experience where the technology enhances activities and doesn’t interfere with them.  The future you’ve seen in movies over the last decade is starting to get closer.