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Posts Tagged ‘ contemporary art ’

Contemporary Artists Fill Museum Walls with Groundbreaking Art


As fans of contemporary art, we’ve always been somewhat surprised by its lack of representation in museums. Galleries like Thinkspace Gallery in Culver City, California—one of our personal favorites—often share the exceptional work of artists today, but why not museums? Thankfully, Long Beach Museum of Art and Andrew Hosner of Thinkspace have teamed up, along with Jasper Hong and Pow! Wow!, to bring an extraordinary display of contemporary art to a museum setting.

With its Vitality and Verve: Transforming the Urban Landscape exhibit, Long Beach Museum of Art is breaking down barriers, and setting a new trend for museums worldwide. Executive Director, Ronald C. Nelson explains, “An opportunity to present an exhibition such as Vitality and Verve: Transforming the Urban Landscape rarely happens in a museum setting. For this exhibition the museum has, for the first time, bared its walls to show murals and paintings created by some of the top international artists working in their field.”

Scrolling down these images, you will probably recognize some of these artists as they have been featured on this site. Participating artists include: Aaron Horkey, Alex Yanes, Andrew Schoultz, Audrey Kawasaki, Brendan Monroe, Brandon Shigeta, Cryptik, Esao Andrews, Greg ‘Craola’ Simkins, Hot Tea, James Bullough, Jeff Soto, John S. Culqui, Low Bros, Meggs, Nosego, Nychos, Saber, and Tristan Eaton.

According to the museum, the exhibit “examines the current developments in the growing field of urban contemporary art. It will feature site-specific ephemeral murals and multi-media installations by established and emerging cutting-edge artists who will be demonstrating the skilled and nuanced application of their craft.

Vitality and Verve aims to illuminate the sensory value and powerful practice of these artists as they transform the urban landscape around them. The meticulous renderings, the hyper-realistic imagery and patterns and the gestural strokes assert the diversity in a fully immersive experience.”

Above: James Bullough / Photo by Eugene Kim for My Modern Met

Artwork by James Bullough / Photo by Eugene Kim for My Modern Met

Artwork by Audrey Kawasaki / Photo by Eugene Kim of My Modern Me

Artwork by Esao Andrews / Photo by Eugene Kim of My Modern Met

Artwork by Jeff Soto / Photo by Eugene Kim of My Modern Met

Artwork by Alex Yanes / Photo by Eugene Kim of My Modern Met

Artwork by C215 / Photo by Eugene Kim of My Modern Met

Photo by Brandon Shigeta and Vincent Ricafort/Pow! Wow! of Kamea Hadar and Reach’s collaboration / Photo by Eugene Kim of My Modern Met

Artwork by Meggs / Photo by Eugene Kim of My Modern Met

Artwork by Cryptik / Photo by Eugene Kim of My Modern Met

Artwork by Andrew Schoultz / Photo by Eugene Kim of My Modern Met

Artwork by Meggs / Photo by Eugene Kim of My Modern Met

Artwork by Nosego / Photo by Eugene Kim of My Modern Met

Artwork by Aaron Horkey / Photo by Eugene Kim of My Modern Met

Artwork by DOTS / Photo by Eugene Kim of My Modern Met

Artwork by Matt Small / Photo by Eugene Kim of My Modern Met

Artwork by Hottea / Photo by Eugene Kim of My Modern Met

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Vertical Glass House In Shanghai


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The Vertical Glass House in Shanghai by Chinese firm Atelier FCJZ, the entire house has glass floors instead of windows, so one can peer directly into the downstairs bathroom from the upstairs dining room. Concrete walls are paired with wooden formwork, and each glass floor fits into a pair of narrow horizontal openings in the walls. Extra lighting along these slots generate stripes of light on the building’s façade at night. Designed by Yung Ho Chang as an urban housing prototype for a competition in 1991, the concept was taken to reality as part of the West Bund Biennale of Architecture and Contemporary Art. The Vertical Glass House now serves as a guesthouse for visiting artists and architects.

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Leonid Tishkov’s Private Moon


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If you think this is a series of unearthly photo-manipulations, then you’re wrong. Moscow-based physician Leonid Tishkov is actually traveling the world with his own personal moon. The artist created the moon 10 years ago for a contemporary art performance, after which he took it back to his apartment and eventually started traveling around the world.

“I have traveled Private Moon for ten years and each time the moon reveals more space to me. The moon is a shining point that brings people together from different countries, of different nationalities and cultures,” – says Leonid.

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Everything But The Paper Cut.


In the year since the Museum of Art and Design reopened in its new digs on Columbus Circle, they’ve been delivering consistently compelling shows–from punk-rock lace to radical knitting experiments. The newest, “Slash: Paper Under the Knife”. The focus is paper–and the way contemporary artists have used paper itself as a medium, whether by cutting, tearing, burning, or shredding. In all, the show features 50 artists and a dozen installations made just for the show, including Andreas Kocks’s Paperwork #701G.

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