Posts Tagged ‘ Airlines ’

The Real Life ‘Robin Hood’ Teams Up With United.


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Normally I hate starting a post with a video, but in this case I feel it’s well deserved.  The ‘Robin Hood’ charity organization fights multiple causes from all around the world, and has teamed up to create two simultaneous events, to help fight poverty in New York city.  With the help of United Airlines, young adults can fly from all over the world to help in this massive doing of good.  You can check out more information about this amazing charity by clicking here.

 

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You’d Never Believe Airlines Look Like This…


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Why is the main course in our in-flight meal usually swimming in sauce? And why is there never enough leg room in economy class? These, and other more serious questions regarding modern day air travel are just some of the questions addressed in a recent book from Laurence King Publishing titled ‘Airline: Style at 30,000 Feet’, written by designer and author Keith Lovegrove. Published in August 2013 as a second, ‘mini’ edition of an older title dating back to 2000, the book sets out to ”illustrate and analyse the successful – and occasionally not so successful – results of the airlines’ relentless quest to vie for attention.” Written honestly and eloquently with a healthy dose of humour, ‘Airline’ is peppered with personal accounts of travelling experiences and anecdotes. Providing an engaging if not rather causal overview of airline travel, the book describes the evolution of airline-related design in four chapters that focus on fashion, interiors, food and branding. Along with the history of commercial aviation, Lovegrove also comments on air travel from a cultural, technical and social point of view, thus putting the whole subject into a wider perspective.

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Brussels Airlines Hires Michelin Starred Chef


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Passengers on the Belgian airline will be able to savor a meal created by one of the top names in contemporary Belgian gastronomy: triple Michelin-starred chef Geert Van Hecke. The chef, who has presided over his Bruges restaurant De Karmeliet for over 30 years, has prepared a starter with smoked Damme eel, tarragon yogurt sauce and mashed fennel. This first course will be followed by a dish of “Bruge-style shrimp,” curried sweet potatoes and steamed snow peas. Flemish beer and cheese will accompany the meal. This menu will be offered to business class passengers on long-haul flights leaving from Brussels for destinations in Africa or the US. The collaboration with Geert Van Hecke is the first in a series of tie-ups in Brussels Airlines’ “Belgian Star Chefs” initiative. Every four to five months, the company will invite a different celebrity chef to renew its business class menu with gourmet dishes based on seasonal, regional ingredients.

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Would You Pay More For A Child Free Flight?


One of the most common frustrations among travelers on long- or short-haul flights appears to be badly behaved children.  A survey carried out among 2,200 travelers by website TripAdvisor, shows that 37 percent of Britons would pay more to guarantee a peaceful flight without children.  Around 34 percent said that children shouldn’t be allowed to fly in first-class cabins, while a fifth of flyers expressed that children kicking the back of their seat was a particular annoyance.  The presence of badly behaved children is a common complaint among passengers around the world.

Malaysia Airlines has banned children from the upper decks of its A380 planes flying between London and Kuala Lumpur and between Sydney and KL. The airline has also confirmed that babies are not longer accepted in its business class cabins.  AirAsia X, a long-haul carrier based in Malaysia, announced its intention to become the second airline to ban children from certain sections of the plane last month.  The new measure will come into effect in February 2013 and will create a “quiet zone” in the first eight rows of the economy section of its A380 aeroplanes.