Posts Tagged ‘ 3D printing ’

Could ‘The Martian’ Happen In Real Life?


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With martian movies smashing the box office and NASA’s recent announcement to put permanent residents on Mars the big news, space colonization seems like all the rage right now. Following the trend, Exo Planet is a narrative that tells a story that tells of out-of-this-world concepts ranging from base stations to astronaut suits and even vehicles. Beyond that, Exo Planet goes on to detail a mission for a crew of 8 to execute interplanetary travel, architecture using 3D printing, and systems for renewable energy.

via YD

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3D Printed Clothes


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Fashion is always changing and 3D printing has really begun to catch on as a way for designers to create outfits, accessories, and even complete dresses using a technology previously delegated to prototyping hardware and industrial parts.

The design studio Nervous System has created a novel process that allows a 3-D printed dress to move and sway like real fabric. The bespoke software behind it, called Kinematics, combines origami techniques with novel approaches to 3-D printing, pushing the technology’s limits.

Instead of pinning fabric to a dress form, a Kinematics garment starts as a 3-D model in a CAD program. Kinematics breaks the model down into tessellated, triangular segments of varying sizes. Designers can control the size, placement, and quantity of the triangles in a Javascript-based design tool and preview how the changes will impact the polygonal pinafore. Once the designer is satisfied, algorithms add hinges to the triangles uniting the garment into a single piece and compress the design into the smallest possible shape to optimize the printing process, often reducing the volume by 85 percent.

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It’s not just the dress — Sandy’s entire outfit has been 3D printed. As for the dress though, it is called the A.X.I.O.S. Dress, which stands for “Advanced Xtreem Integrated Operating Scales.” It is made of an armor-like pattern created by designer Cameron Williams back in April 2014. Using SOLIDWORKS, Williams has modified this pattern slightly, to make it more appropriate for a dress design. It is 3D printed using about $78 worth of ABS, Wolfbend TPU, and TPE materials, and was designed and printed to be a perfect fit for Sandy’s body.

“The dress is more comfortable than I imagined, it even makes music when I move,” said Sandy.

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Worlds First 3d Printed Metal Gun By Solid Concepts


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It seems there’s no end to 3D printing’s potential, and the world’s first 3D-printed metal gun is the latest innovation to be birthed from the budding technology. Many of you will remember the first 3D printed plastic gun (it was literally toasted after firing off just one shot), but this is something entirely different. The folks at Austin, Texas based Solid Concepts have created a metal 3D-printed gun using DMLS (direct metal laser sintering) technology, and this thing shows a lot of promise. Unlike its plastic predecessor, the metal version of the 1911 series firearm has fired off 50 rounds, and still going strong, with no damage to the gun itself (at least that’s why Solid Concepts says).  Before you get too worried about your neighbor printing out a batch of guns, the company says that “there are barriers to keep the public away from the technology for years.”

 

eBay Unveil 3D Printing App


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As the 3D printing revolution continues to gain pace, eBay have jumped on the bandwagon with a new iPhone app that lets users customise accessories before they are printed and shipped out to them. Named eBay Exact, the simple app shows you several items from 3D printing companies MakerBot, Sculpteo and Hot Pop Factory – mostly iPhone cases and jewelry. You then pick an item and modify features like the pattern, material, shape and color. Although the app is rather basic at this stage, it could become key part of eBay’s business, signalling a shift towards highly customisable products.