Posts Tagged ‘ Tourist ’

Valley Of The Blue Flame.


We know this sounds straight out of a Star Wars film, but Ruben Wu was on a trip to visit the Ijen and Bromo Tengger Semeru volcanoes in East Java last month.  Not all of it sounds that strange… he’s a Chicago-based photographer that captured the unusual sight of molten sulphur.  Ok, well, now it gets weird again.  Molten sulphur flows from fumaroles at the base of the aptly named Blue Fire Crater at Ijen. The area is usually swarming with tourists, but Wu stayed after sunset until the moon rose to capture these otherworldly images.

The journey into the Ijen Caldera is not for the faint hearted. A two-hour trek up the side of the rocky volcano is followed by another 45-minute hike down to the bank of the crater. The blue fire found at the base is the result of ignited sulphuric gas that burns up to 600 degrees Celsius (1,112 degrees Fahrenheit) and can flare up to 5 meters (16 feet) into the air. It is the largest “blue flame” area on Earth.  Check the photos out.

The Floating Island.


The world’s largest artificial floating island has finished its first week as a major new tourism attraction in Seoul, South Korea.  Seoul‘s Han River will eventually be home to a floating archipelago of three man-made “islets”, but the first island, Viva, opened to the public last week.  At 3,271 square meters, it is the second-largest of the three and is home to a three-storey structure housing a 700-seat convention hall and several other attractions such as restaurants and video games.  There are parks, outdoor terraces and viewing points surrounding the center, while at night, the exterior of the building is illuminated with brightly colored light shows.  When the next islands open in September, the 20,400 square meter complex will offer three cultural centers, featuring performances, water sports and aquatic events.  The islands can accommodate 6,200 people and are set to make the Han River, which 59 million people visited last year, an even more popular tourist spot.  While artificial islands have been constructed before, most famously in Dubai, they have generally been formed by pouring sand on the seabed to create artificial land.  Seoul’s islands take a different approach and actually float on the surface of the river using an enormous buoy secured in place by 28 mooring chains, a design which ensures it can withstand changing river levels and bad weather.  Check the method.