Posts Tagged ‘ Sculptures ’

One Of The Strangest Farms You’ll Ever See.


 


Gibbs Farm is an unusual setting for a sculpture collection. The North Auckland property is dominated by the Kaipara Harbour, the largest harbour in the Southern hemisphere.  Walking the land visitors can appreciate how each artist has come to terms in their own way with the gravitational pull that is exerted on everything as the mountains roll into hills and slide into gullies and slope down towards the wide flat expanse of the Kaipara harbour.

After nearly twenty years Gibbs Farm includes major works by Graham Bennett, Chris Booth, Daniel Buren, Bill Culbert, Neil Dawson, Marijke de Goey, Andy Goldsworthy, Ralph Hotere, Anish Kapoor, Sol LeWitt, Len Lye, Russell Moses, Peter Nicholls, Eric Orr, Tony Oursler, George Rickey, Peter Roche, Richard Serra, Kenneth Snelson, Richard Thompson, Leon van den Eijkel and Zhan Wang.

 

 

 

 

Take A Look Through These… Glass Organs?


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What happens when Sigga Heimis from Labland pairs up with the team at Corning Glasses GlassLab? You end up with human organs laying all around the room, but thankfully, they are made from glass not human tissue. The GlassLab is the design and production arm of the Corning Museum of Glass. Their collaboration with Sigga Heimis produced a series of human organs including kidneys, stomach, heart, lungs, eyes, intestines, the human brain, and magic. The translucent organs are amazingly details reproductions of human organs carefully blown and stitched together by the glass artisans at the GlassLab. Many pieces required the team work of 3 to 4 glass artisans working in unison to rotate, hold, and position the pieces as molten glass was added.

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Wait Till You See What These Sculptures Are Really Made Of.


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Ben Young, the self-taught artist is currently based in Sydney, was raised in Waihi Beach, New Zealand, where the local landscape and surroundings greatly inspired his art.  His incredible glass sculptures have a distinct realism that bring the feel of the ocean, while still having clean, crisp feel to them.  Check the method.

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Li Hongbo Is Probably The Reason You’re Out Of Paper.


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Li Hongbo is one of most gifted sculptors in recent memory.  His medium is a bit unconventional however.  A book editor and designer, Li became fascinated by traditional Chinese toys and festive decorations known as paper gourds made from glued layers of thin paper which can be stored flat but then opened to reveal a flower or other shape. He applied the same honeycomb-like paper structure to much larger human forms resulting in these highly flexible sculptures.

What Happens When You Mix A Forumla 1 Car And A Shark?


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Check out these awesome sea-creature sculptures from Japanese artist Showichi Kaneda. He combines brand-intensive, slick and somewhat predatory shapes of Formula 1 cars with sea predators like sharks and giant squid in his “Human’s Own Evo” series.

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All That Is Not Itself


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Paintings, sculptures, readymades, works on paper, and digital works by Chad Wys.

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Yuki Matsueda’s 3D Sculptures


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Yuki Matsueda is one of the most interesting talents in 3D wall sculptures today. He takes graphics we expect to be flat and turns them into leaping in your face 3D sculptures that catch your attention and make his message clear. You stare at the jigsaw puzzle seeing that one dastardly piece that is always missing, exploding from the puzzle headed into oblivion. The exit sign man is making his break running out of the sign into the open air of the room. Yuki’s playful look at the two dimensional world around us creates a sense of fun, humor, and deeper communication.

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CCTV Documentary


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Motion sculptures for CCTV Documentary Channel is a digital metaphor of phenomenal blinks and moments that life consists of. In four Idents we follow a visual performance of organic and vital substance, animated using data of actors movements. Idents visualize four different themes. To emphasize the emotion of each Ident, we have decided to use different textures of steel, wood and glass. Motion sculpture of steel reflects old Chinese adage that true power is mastering yourself. Youthful energy of dancers evolve into beautiful organic sculpture. Colorful happiness is the engine of father’s and his daughter’s joy. Two lovers visualize fragility and vitality of love in the last Ident.

Andreas Nicolas Fischer


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Spectral Density Estimation is a pair of sculptures commissioned by the SECCA and the Winston-Salem Symphony orchestra. Two sound recordings of the first organized tuning were taken at the last 2 orchestra performances of the 2012 / 2013 season. Each recording was analyzed and transformed into a spatial arrangement of the audio frequencies over time. The resulting geometry was then carved into a block of wood from a cedar tree, that had fallen outside the museum.

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Stunning Sculptures by Tom Eckert


12 01 02 03When we’re talking about wooden sculptures the first things came in mind is figures of people, animals, fruits etc. But American sculptor Tom Eckert breaks stereotypes. Tom Eckert received his M.F.A. degree from Arizona State University, with advanced study at California State University at Northridge. He uses a wide variety of woodworking techniques in his sculptural pieces, including laminating, bending, carving, turning and painting.

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Street Fighter Motion Sculptures | 2013


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For Dan the Ad Man – an Ireland-based video director and art director — the desire to learn CINEMA 4D and Vray in his spare time lead to an inventive, pop-culture influenced dimensional short film. Building on the characters within the iconic Street Fighter 2 video game, Dan was able to render dimensional executions of each character into a video that is set to sampled Capcom’s Street Fighter 2 in-game sound effects. Blending his personal passion in the world of 4D graphics with the nostalgia of one of his favorite video games, the Street Fighter Motion Sculptures video renderings represent the colors, moves and shapes of a variety of the game’s characters.

Beautiful Origami by Jaroslav Mishchenko


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By using origami technique Kiev based artist Jaroslav Mishchenko can create almost any object from a car and up to animals figurines. These paper 3D sculptures he paints in the proper color palette to make them look more natural.

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Stunning Sculptures by Regardt van der Meulen


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These stunning sculptures by Johannesburg-based artist Regardt van der Meulen. The following sculptures made from steel are called “Drip”, “Deconstructed”. And the newest one is “Ballerina”. Sculptor says: “The human body with its strength and fragility lie at the core of this series of works, while exposing the illusion of safety in modern society.”

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Typographical Wax Sculptures


These typographical sculptures may look like they are carved from some precious, multi-colored stone, but in fact they are molded layer by layer out of something far more available: wax. Artist Keetra Dean Dixon in collaboration with JK Keller, have been creating these massive pieces for a number of years now. The deeply embossed typography in their work is surrounded by layer after layer of color, as if the letters are being hugged by the wax. In the a issue of 8 Faces magazine (number 5), Keetra Dean Dixon explains a bit of the process behind each piece:

We cut positive type forms and position them on the top of the grid, and we take hot wax and manually start coating all of those letterforms and catching the drips underneath in the basins. And as the layers cool, we shift the colour of the wax that we’re applying to them and we manually layer again and again until it builds up a mass of wax. […] Then we have to take the positive letterforms out of the interior of the wax piece.

Daniel Agdag Creator of “Sets for a Film I’ll Never Make”


The word which first comes to mind when observing these new works by Daniel Agdag: meticulous. Already known for an award-winning stop motion film, he has now set his talented hands to the task of creating a series of sculptures: “Sets for a Film I’ll Never Make”. Each astoundingly detailed model is constructed using sliced cardboard and PVA glue – mediums you would hardly associate with such precise work.

What makes these art deco styled pieces even more impressive is the fact that Agdag creates them as what he calls “paper sketches.” Working without a plan he creates each work from spontaneous inspiration, developing them as he goes. When you look at the masses of thin paper wire, switchboards, pulleys and cogs in many of his works – or the fact that when photographed the scenes look as realistic as if they’ve sprung from the screen of a vintage film-noir – this feat is really fantastic.

Stunning Glass Sculptures by Robert Mickelson


Artist Robert Mickelson is an expert sculptor who had created the following stunning sculptures. Robert thinks that every sculpture is a reflection of person’s own feelings and ideas. The objects he created are narratives… personal vignettes that reveal the secrets of his innermost thoughts. These are often mysteries even to him until the creative process reveals them and so the work becomes a form of self-discovery.

Robert Bradford – Recycled Toy Sculptures


Robert Bradford creates his life-size and larger-than-life sculptures of humans and animals from discarded plastic items, mainly toys but also other colorful plastic bits and pieces, such as combs and buttons, brushes and parts of clothes pegs. Contrary to some reports, he’s not a self-taught artist who tinkered in his shed one day and suddenly decided to create something out of his kids’ discarded toys. He is a London-born and U.K. and U.S.-trained visual artist who, like many artists, also had another career on the side. His was that of a psychotherapist.

In 2002, he started to consider the possibilities that his children’s forgotten toys could have as part of something bigger. Bradford says he likes the idea that the plastic pieces have a history, some unknown past, and that they also pass on a “cultural” history as each of the pieces represents a point in time. Recycling is not his primary concern, but each sculpture certainly keeps quite a few pieces from becoming landfill. Some of the sculptures contain pieces from up to 3,000 toys.

Yuki Matsueda.


While most designers are busying adding more and more elements into their artworks, Japan-based Yuki Matsueda has, however, managed to let some elements escape from his art pieces. The result seems quite amazing… A vivid 3D image is successfully created and all the elements are believed to be more shocking than those stay still on paper.

So Icy… Literally.


Rain and ice are typically things that people associate with bad traffic, an unpleasant day, or just not wanting to go out.  But in South China around the time of the last Olympics, this amazing collection of photos was taken of what happens when ice forms from rain in the night onto the foliage.  I don’t normally use the word “pretty”, but there aren’t too many other things that come to mind.

The Will Kurtz Sculptures.


Will Kurtz‘s paper sculptures bring ordinary New Yorkers to life. Extra Fucking Ordinary is Will Kurtz’s debut exhibition at the Mike Weiss Gallery.’The show consists of life size figural sculptures constructed of collaged torn sheets of newspaper, wood, wire, screws, tape and everyday objects which depict the characters captured by Kurtz’s iPhone camera lens. Utilizing the observing eye of a curious urban voyeur, Kurtz spends large portions of his days combing the streets of New York for his subjects, which are later transformed into sincere and amusing life-size sculptures.  It is not the subjects’ aesthetic appeal that draws Kurtz as much as their essence and strong representation of the multitude of prototypes that typify New York City: from an old married couple and endearingly eccentric dog owners to curmudgeonly middle-aged smokers.

Kurtz’s sculptures openly reference real people engaged in real scenarios, be it posing for group shots at a tourist attraction, walking their dog, awkwardly changing their clothes or reluctantly sweeping the floors. Kurtz holds an admiringly holds a magnifying glass to the genre of subjects and scenes that are commonly overlooked. The subjects collectively present a candid and unapologetic mosaic of New Yorkers in their blunt, colorful, borderline-manic ways made of the same papers they read in coffee shops and subways during their morning commute.’

The Illest Paper Cuts.


Peter Callesen thrives on creating art from paper, rather on it. Using paper only as a source, he creates beautiful sculptural works. Each work is made by cutting out one sheet of paper, and using the removed scraps to create figures, buildings, and other objects. His work ranges from 2D to 3D. These sheets range from small a4 size or as big as 7m by 5m. The materialization of a flat piece of paper becomes a magical process for him. Callesen’s  interest grows while the possibilities as practically endless.

Peter Callesen was born in Denmark, 1967. He attended Goldsmiths College in London, as well as other Art & Architecture schools. Currently Peter hosts many exhibitions showcasing his incredible work. While judging his crafts, you start to see all of the challenges he faced midway through. Think about how he planned things out, and how easy it is to mess up the whole piece if you miss-judge the cutting process. Peter explains that he themes his works based on classical fairy tales, personal interests, and past memories. This shows a great dedication he caters to each and everyone of his works.

The Paper People.


Celebrity and historical figures find a second life in these paper miniatures by ‘People Too’, the collaborative efforts of Russian designers Alexei Lyapunov and Lena Ehrlich.  Using a range of knives, scissors, tweezers, and other tools on wire and a combination of construction and specialty papers, the team creates not only miniature furniture and figures but also entire sets for the pieces.  Their ‘star’ series represents famous musicians, from Michael Jackson to Queen to Elton John.  Check it out.

Folded Page Book Art.


Isaac G. Salazar is the artist behind these incredible book “sculptures”. He’s been creating these intricate works of art since October 2009. His books first started out simple and have recently become more complex in design.  Check the method.

Mark Newman’s Sculptures.


Of course, I’m not talk about the british physicist when I say the name Mark Newman.  This Newman is a sculptor artist born in the U.S. in 1962, and has been sculpting for the last 19 years.  There’s no telling what his first statues looked like, but now a days he produced super-realisitic, almost pictures perfect work that can catch anyones eye.  Check the method below.

From Skateboards to Scluptures.


I’m a big fan of anything that has to do with skateboarding, especially since so many of my boys take it very seriously.  Haroshi is a Japanese artist who takes old, thrashed and broken skateboards and turns them into beautiful wooden sculptures.  Some of these sculptures look so life-like that if they weren’t multicolored, you might mistake them for being real.  Haroshi goes through thousands of old skateboard decks and handpicks each piece that he wants to use.  Once he picks the material he stacks them on top of each other, cuts them down to size, shaves off the excess debris and paints them.  The final product is then coated with a glossy finish.  The coolest aspect of each recycled skateboard sculpture isn’t what it looks like on the outside.  Haroshi likes to give each piece “a soul,” so as he’s constructing it he puts a broken metal skateboard piece in the center.  It’s kind of like the “heart” of his work.  Check the method.