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Posts Tagged ‘ Lights ’

Solar Blinds That Charge Your Phone?


The Rolar Blinds do three things. They harness the energy of the sun, they cut the glare of the sun out during the day, keeping your indoors ambient, and they look absolutely gorgeous while they do the above two.

The Rolar Blinds stand at the crux between new-age photovoltaic printing techniques, a rise in demand for solar panels, and absolute graphic beauty, as they explore printing solar cells in manners that almost feel like graffiti, but with a more direct purpose, i.e., charging your devices. At the bottom of the blinds rest the cylindrical weights that come with a USB port that let you charge your devices or your power-banks by simply plugging them into the curtain and leaving them on a table nearby or the windowsill as you tap into the solar system’s largest (free) power source.

The cylindrical members (battery packs) are even detachable, allowing you to carry your power with you. However, the convenience of the Rolar Blinds takes second place to its graphical beauty that bring art and technology together beautifully and seamlessly.

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The Circuit Marker Is A Sight To Behold.


The moment of electricity though a circuit board is something that can be extremely fluid, as fluid ink from a pen.  Check out the beauty that silver micro-particles circuitry and origami paper, that becomes a city of lights.

Get Your Head In The Clouds.


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Clouds are natural canvases and in certain conditions, they can look very picturesque. French artist and photographer Charles Pétillion drew inspiration from the visually limitless variations of cloud formations to create a cumulus cloud using over 10,000 illuminated white balloons. The installation, titled, “Heartbeat”, is featured inside London’s Covent Garden and stretches the length of its entire South Hall.

Describing the project, Pétillion says, “With Heartbeat I wanted to represent the Market Building as the beating heart of this area — connecting its past with the present day to allow visitors to re-examine its role at the heart of London’s life.” Check out some more photos below.

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Interactive Blue Light Art by Gabey Tjon a Tham


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Interactive artist Gabey Tjon a Tham has created a light installation in which lights dance to music and spiral in different forms. In the piece Repetition At My Distance, the blue lights are transformed into beautiful twists that change shape as they move, sparking a new era of mobile 3D art. The art form in the future may adapt to reacting with other lights, voice and other inputs.

There are a total of 16 dancing streams of light that change with the vibrations of the speakers, varying the speed, brightness, and synchronization as the lights dim and brighten. The lights even move independently and others they all synchronize together. At some points some of the lights disappear while some remain on and still moving.

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New York Photo Series by Thomas Ciszewski


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Check out these photos that was taken in New York by Thomas Ciszewski. He really has a way of capturing the city.

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Makoto Tojiki’s Light Sculptures.


Japanese artist Makoto Tojikil is fascinated by light. He uses it in ways that create amazing illusions and out-of-this-world experiences in a subtle, inquisitive way. These pieces are known as “No Shadow”. As you can see these large animals and human sculptures are made of strands of light  that seem to evoke a sense of playfulness, awe, possibility and wonder.

Rashad Alakbarov Paints with Shadows and Light


Artist Rashad Alakbarov from Azerbaijan uses suspended translucent objects and other found materials to create light and shadow paintings on walls. The jaw-dropping light painting above, made with an array of colored airplanes has recently had his work at the “Fly to Baku” exhibition at De Pury Gallery in London.

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