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Posts Tagged ‘ Instructions ’

The Art Of Plating.


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With my affinity for both cooking, and fine dining, it used to seem as though certain dishes only seem to be accessible at the best restaurants on the planet. The website ‘The Art Of Plating’, has luckily made it a point to demonstrate to chefs, and food aficionados alike how to get your plates to look like they came from the kitchen of a 5 star restaurant.  Check some of their examples, and make sure to pass by their site.

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The Creation Of A 1940’s Pin Up Girl.


Almost everyone is familiar with Pin Up girl photos from the 30’s, 40’s, and 50’s.  It was an intriguing brand of imagery back in the day, and now is always portrayed as classic.  I personally have always loved the style, but never really knew how they produced the photos.  Apparently taking pictures, and re-engineering the imagery though illustration was the way to do it.  Check out some examples below.

Pulteney Single Malt… The “World’s Best Whisky”.


A single malt whisky produced by a distillery in a remote part of Scotland has beaten 1,200 whiskies from around the world to be crowned World Whisky of the Year.  The Old Pulteney whisky produced by the Pulteney distillery in Wick, northern Scotland, took the top spot in Jim Murray’s respected 2012 Whisky Bible.  Despite Scotland’s reputation as the home of whisky, it is only the second time a Scottish distillery has won the coveted title.  The 21-year-old dram scored 97.5 points out of 100, equalling the best ever score achieved by a whisky in Murray’s ratings.  Whisky expert Murray tasted more than 1,200 whiskies to put together the eighth annual Whisky Bible. The Pulteney 21-year-old was one of the last whiskies to be put to the test.  Murray said:”I was on the home straight after four months of continuous tasting. By that time I was pretty sure I knew what the winner was going to be. It needed something exceptional to knock the leader off its perch.  “That’s exactly what happened. To be honest, I was amazed. I had never come across a Pulteney 21-year-old like it.”  The whisky is matured in American Oak casks and bottled at the 185-year-old Pulteney distillery which claims to be the most northerly distillery in mainland Britain.  Despite its long history, Murray said the Pulteney single malt (which sells for £75/$120 a bottle) is still largely unknown because it lacked “the financial muscle of the major whisky barons”, Murray said.  Two US bourbons were runners up in this year’s rankings. George T Stagg took the second place prize and 10-year-old Parker’s Heritage collection Wheated Mash Bourbon finished in third.

Underwater Photo, Or Baroque Painting?


With all of her effects created in-camera using the refraction of light and movement in different depths of water, Christy Lee Rogers creates pictures that look like Baroque paintings without the help of Photoshop. Her obsession with water as a medium coupled with her dedication to photography as an artistic medium, makes her work truly stand out.  Her subjects are wrapped in fabric, bathing in darkness. The water allows the bodies and fabric to move slowly and fluidly. Rogers shoots in swimming pools at night and her sessions can last two to four hours. The night’s natural darkness helps her achieve the black background she needs to surround her subjects in.

In this latest collection she calls Odyssey, Rogers explores such grand themes as birth, life and death. “The story of Odyssey exists in clumps of ideas and energy, griping emotions and the simplicity of truth beyond words,” she explains to us. “Like Homer’s epic Odyssey, life is an exciting and tumultuous adventure filled with thrilling characters to meet along the way. But metaphorically, Odyssey is a much bigger story than that, where the attributes and abilities of mankind soar to an unseen, indescribable level.”  More than anything, Rogers wanted to impart a sense of wonder and tranquility, to provide a bit of solace from our hectic, everyday lives. In addition she says, “The work of an artist lies in manifesting their inner world externally, so you are also experiencing my quest for the answers to life and the knowledge that’s contained in and around it.”

The TetraBox Light.


Designer Ed Chew takes a green step in the right direction with the TetraBox lamp, a light object made from discarded drink packets that would have otherwise ended up in landfills already packed to the brim. The design is achieved by unfolding the packets and refolding them into hexagonal and pentagonal sections that are then pieced together to form a geodesic sphere or any other desired shape. Here, the Epcot-like ball makes an attractive overhead light and casts an impressive web of shadows and shapes on the surrounding space.  Super dope.

Old School ‘Do It Yourself’ Ads.


Anytime we see ad’s from the 30’s or 40’s, things just strike us as odd.  (I know for me in particular, the ads the say cigarets improve your health), but things in general just kind of didn’t make sense.  That was never more apparent when I saw a collection of Do It Yourself Ads from that time period.  People were advertising things that didn’t make sense, would take years of expertise to accomplish, or were just downright impossible.  But in the 30’s and 40’s, I guess it was perfectly fine to sell nothing but a dream.

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Phonograph: June 1919

Can’t afford a phonograph? Try building one yourself. The Modern Phonograph Supply Company offered blueprints, diagrams, and metal parts to customers who were confident enough to construct 1919’s hottest gadgets by themselves. The Makafone cost just one-fourth the price of a regular machine of equal quality, came with a bundle of free records, and could be sold for a profit of $50 – $75.

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Erector Set: December 1935

During the holiday season, we advertised A.C. Gilbert’s No. 7 1/2 Motorized Erector set as a last-minute Christmas present. What boy wouldn’t uphold “25 pounds of scientific thrills” as the world’s greatest toy? As the illustration shows, this kit could actually produce hundreds of different steam shovels, ferries wheels, airships, automobiles, and more. The kit also came with a toy motor for additional realism.

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Telescope Lens Kit: April 1941

Do-it-yourself telescope kits might be common nowadays, but you’d be hard-pressed to find parts that cost just $1.95. Brownscope’s 100x telescope lens kit, which was suited for refracting telescopes, came with two astronomical eyepieces and one polished objective lens. As if you weren’t saving enough money by buying an inexpensive lens, the advertisement also recommended making a profit by charging people to look through your newly-upgraded telescope.

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Trailer Shell: June 1949

A 12-foot trailer for $299? Sounds like a sweet deal to us. DIY trailer kits from U-BUILD-IT came with everything you could possibly need for a basic shell: windows, doors, exterior panels, tires, roof ends, and a chassis, to name a few. The kit required no experience and no expensive tools.

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Magic Art Reproducer: January 1958

Now, this advertisement is a little vague about how the product actually works, but what can you expect from a $2 mystery gadget described as a “magic art reproducer”? According to the description, this tool would turn real-life objects into faint line drawings. With a little bit of tracing, talentless artists would be able to sketch everything from the human body, to bowls of fruit, to blueprints at a professional level.

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Electronic Organ: March 1960

While fine organs take years of training to construct, this DIY kit allowed just about anyone to build their own electronic organ for just $18.94. You could also order a 10-inch LP demonstration record for further instruction.

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Fireplace: September 1967

While a DIY fireplace seems like a challenging, even hazardous, home project, The Majestic Company claimed that you could build their wood-burning fireplaces without any expensive tools or masonry. It could fit in any room (except the bathroom, of course) and came in a variety of styles. You could choose from a corner fireplace, a front model, and pick either real brick tops or synthetic brick tops.

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Gyrocopter: November 1968

Speaking of hazards, how about the Bensen Aircraft Corporation’s build-it-yourself gyrocopter? Anyone who bought this would be the envy of his neighborhood. The gyrocopter came with interchangeable wheels and floats, required less landing space than a plane, and would glide gracefully to the ground if the engine broke… Or so it says on the box.

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Kit-a-Month Program: November 1969

While most of our DIY kits catered to home construction and car modification, we certainly indulged readers with a penchant for science projects. For just a $1.00 enrollment fee, and $4.95 per kit, you could make your own analog computer, light transmitter-receiver, weather station, atomic energy lab, and more. Members could either receive the kit on a monthly basis, or they could order all the projects at once for $49.50.

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Jet Powered Space Ranger: December 1977

Maybe we should just end the gallery here because clearly, nothing can beat this mail order item. The Space Ranger could reach a height of 5,000 feet, could take off and land vertically, and ran on “easily obtainable fuel.” Despite its fantastical appearance, the Space Ranger could be easily assembled in just a few days (supposedly). The entire thing cost 250 pounds and was available for a mere $5,795.

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DIY Sports Cars: October 1982

Embarrassed by your unsightly Corvair? Try outfitting it with a glamorous bolt-on body. With a little bit of tinkering, you could become the proud owner of a T-Bird, Porsche, or Ferrari, without going into debt over your purchase. Unlike the original sports cars, though, the bodies of kit cars are made of fiberglass coated in polyester resin instead of sheet metal.

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Cartridge of Tear Gas: February 1949

This isn’t exactly a DIY project, but we couldn’t resist including it in our roundup of mail order items. Before fog horns became the vigilant civilian’s weapon of choice, people carried cartridges of tear gas in their purses as a defense against attackers. Pens could shoot tear gas at a distance of 15 feet. Unlike most of the other kits advertised in the back section of our magazine, this one could be ordered for free. Safety first.

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Radio Hat: October 1949

Long before pocket-sized music devices were invented, Victor T. Hoeflich’s Radio Hat was the frontrunner in portable entertainment. The circuit was sewn into the hat’s lining, while the radio was powered by a small external battery pack. Despite its kooky appearance, this hat was a triple threat: for just $7.95, you could make a fashion statement, shield your eyes from the sun, and listen to your favorite programs.

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