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Posts Tagged ‘ Google Glass ’

Virgin Atlantic Google Glass Check-In


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Virgin Atlantic business and first class passengers (Upper Class passengers, as they’re called in Britain) flying from London Heathrow airport will be greeted by employees wearing Google Glass or a Sony SmartWatch 2. The wearable technology will be used to identify and greet passengers by name and provide the latest updates on their flight information, weather and local events at their destination. The airline also foresees potential for the technology to help deliver more personalized services such as identifying travelers’ food preferences. Virgin Atlantic is testing the program in a six-week pilot project before considering a wider roll-out.

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Google Glass Titanium Eyewear Collection


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Google Glass is one of the most ambitious concept-to-reality projects we’ve seen in quite some time but the glasses were far from stylish. The brand is looking to tackle this task next as they unveil the Google Glass Titanium Eyewear Collection. There are four new frame shapes, and all of them will work with prescription lenses. To ensure they were offering something that style-conscious consumers would wear, Google teamed up with Maui Jim for the three sunglass options. All of the new styles utilize second generation Google Glass hardware, which means they are all equipped with the mono earbud.

Mercedes-Benz experimenting with Google Glass


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Mercedes-Benz’s North American R&D chief claims the ultimate goal is to use Google’s head-worn computer to create a seamless GPS system. Despite the fact that Gary C. Howell, a member of the West Virginia House of Delegates, is currently trying to pass a bill that would make them illegal while driving, Mercedes-Benz’s US research and development arm is hard at work developing in-car applications for Google Glass. In an interview with Business Journal this week, Johann Jungwirth, president and CEO of Mercedes-Benz Research & Development North America, says that the company’s ultimate goal is to create a “seamless” door-to-door transition between pedestrian directions and in-car GPS. The idea being that the information displayed via the headset automatically switches from in-car navigation to on-foot directions the moment the driver kills the engine and alights from his or her luxury German sedan. The contextual awareness of Google Glass would mean that a destination would only have to be entered once to cover the journey, no matter how many different forms of transport were required to arrive at a destination. As a device, Google Glass is still also very much in its own R&D phase. Only a handful of the headsets are ‘in the wild’ and they mostly belong to developers who are busy getting to grips with what the wearable computer can do and how they can best exploit its features via specially created apps. Google is yet to confirm when a consumer-ready Google Glass will hit the shops other than to say some time in late 2014.

Time calls Google Glass “Best Invention of the Year”


Time Tech recently announced their Best Inventions of 2012 list and included in the list is Google Glass, Google’s augmented reality eyewear project. Hailed by Time magazine as “the device that will make augmented reality part of our daily lives,” the tech giant’s Google Glass headset has already been released to developers and is expected to go on general sale in 2014, priced at $1500. The device incorporates a speaker, microphone, computer display and forward-facing camera and enables users to surf the internet, take photos, check email, and make and receive phone calls, all through voice and gesture commands. The device is classified as augmented reality because of the way in which it presents information and data. As the wearer looks in a certain direction, information specific to what the user can see will be presented in a non-intrusive manner in their field of vision, whether it is historical information about landmarks, the quickest route to the closest subway station, or reviews of the restaurants that line the street.

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