Posts Tagged ‘ Factory ’

THIS Is Why A Rolex Is So Expensive…


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If you’ve ever wondered why a Rolex was so expensive you may want to watch this demonstration of a Rolex Submariner being disassembled, showing the intricacies involved in the time piece in exquisite detail.  The demonstration is of course performed by a professional watchmaker, who meticulously picks apart the watch with great skill.  Although back in the 50’s, they weren’t as expensive.

“First revealed to the public in 1953, the Rolex Submariner was a diving watch for everyone. Appealing to both professional and hobby divers, the Submariner set the standard for the category, its affordability and practicality unmatched. Rolex also developed non-chronometer versions of the Submariner that were even more affordable, costing roughly two weeks’ pay at the time.”

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Meat Balloons


Balloon Factory (a project by Object Design League) was invited by Sight Unseen to design a window installation for Japan Premium Beef as part of the NoHo Design District, a recurring gathering of off-site design events during the annual International Contemporary Furniture Fair in New York each year.

The Balloon Factory project started as a performance, but it has persisted as a factory. They produce balloons for special events and by request. For Japan Premium Beef, they made a set of butcher-themed balloons (in the tradition of Sam Baron’s sausage installation there in 2010). A selection of uninflated steak balloons were displayed on butcher trays, framed by an installation of hanging sausage balloon links. This iteration extends the original Balloon Factory project and carries a strong reference to the intricate fake food prevalent in restaurant windows in Japan.

A Peek Inside The Lamborghini Factory.


The Italian automaker founded in 1963 by feisty Ferrari hater Ferruccio Lamborghini built a long line of swoopy exotics that demanded passionate, dedicated drivers — with an equally passionate and dedicated mechanic on speed dial. Several ownership changes over the years, including an ill-fated union with Chrysler in the 1980s didn’t help the cause. Lamborghinis inspired lust, but consistency of build and reliability proved elusive… Until the Germans got involved.

Audi’s takeover of the company in 1998 instigated dramatic changes in how the famed cars from Sant’Agata Bolognese were conceived, developed and constructed. Eager to retain the brand’s “Italianness,” the Germans kept company headquarters in Sant’Agata, much like how Bugatti remained stationed in Molsheim, France, and Bentley didn’t stray from Crewe, England, once Volkswagen took over.

The German influence not only resulted in shared platforms (like the Audi R8/Lamborghini Gallardo aluminum spaceframe), it also brought a sea change in how emerging technologies are researched, developed and incorporated into the ever-evolving world of supercars.

Lamborghini hit a landmark when it sold its 10,000th Gallardo in 2010, a figure that represents more than all other models produced since the company’s founding. As a replacement for the mighty Murcielago approached the zenith of its three-year development, camouflaged mules were spotted darting through Italian countrysides and along the famed Nürburgring Nordschliefe, and the 691-horsepower flagship was being “fine optimized” in preparation for production.