Posts Tagged ‘ DJ Storms Blog ’

Caity Costa – Butterfly.


Caity Costa has been on the music scene for quite some time, be it in music videos, on magazine covers, or just straight up in your ears with a flurry of solo songs and collaborations with artists all over. Now she’s on the scene once again with her newest title track “Butterfly”, just one quarter of the Butterfly EP, being released all throughout the month of October. The song ‘Butterfly’ itself finds a truly unique and refreshing blend between sultry R&B singing, and an incredible spoken word poem embodying her thoughts and feelings. Its a joy to listen to, and the song embodies the emotions of many, while its presentation has only been approached by few. The wonderfully executed track was produced by Bat Area native Joe Major, and is available for a listen by just clicking the cover above, and hear a sample in the promo video below.

Osaka’s Sushi Harasho.


Leading Osaka’s fine restaurant scene is a master chef who seeks for the most natural way to savor sushi. “Gentle sushi” as he describes it, Harasho’s cuisine is minimalist in approach while founded on classic Edomae principles. Focusing on the pure flavor of the fish, the restaurant continues to earn two Michelin stars and allure gourmands from across Japan and abroad. Relocated to a new location in the southeastern end of the city, Chef Ko Ishikawa has invested time and energy in curating a space worthy to serve top-class sushi. Found in a quiet residential neighborhood, the picturesque entrance is set with curated greenery and a kawara tile roof, creating a peaceful ambiance. Behind the thick noren curtain, a tall vase of seasonal flowers, arranged by the chef’s sister, welcomes all those who make the pilgrimage.

 Taking more than six months to complete, the interior of the restaurant is built using traditional sukiya-style architecture, the fine work by Sankakuya, a group of Kyoto craftsmen. Lit up with spotlights, the 23-feet hinoki wood counter stretches long and wide, allowing as many as eleven guests on one side, and two chefs on the other. The chairs are set slightly apart, setting a luxurious scene for the exquisite meal to be commence.  As you sit down in your chair, your eyes naturally gravitate toward the single piece of art behind the counter. The flower-shaped plate with deep gray tint is a masterpiece by Imaizumi Imaemon, the legendary Iro-Nabeshima porcelain artist and a Living National Treasure. Surrounded by works of true craftsmen, here is Ishikawa’s mastery on display.

Metal Mosaics.


At the heart of Matt Small’s practice is the idea that “there’s always potential within everything.” The British artist gravitates toward an overarching theme of disregard in both subject matter and material, choosing oxidized hunks of iron, bits of patinaed copper, and crinkled aluminum strips that have been relegated to the trash to construct his metallic portraits.  Expressive and emotionally charged, the corroded mosaics link rampant overconsumption and widespread tendencies to throw away what’s deemed obsolete or undesirable to the ways adolescents are marginalized and subsequently not seen as viable members of society. “Because of the social backgrounds they come from, young people find themselves overlooked, disregarded, and left uninvested in,” the artist says. “Marrying the discarded item and painting a portrait of a young person on it or utilizing the material to construct a mosaic face, I hope that the viewer sees that everybody and everything has a right to be viewed as valuable and of worth. It’s just up to us to see that.”  In a conversation with Colossal, Small references Marcel Duchamp’s urinal and the way that readymade sculpture upended long-standing notions of worth as a foundational concept he draws on his own practice. 

By turning debris and seemingly useless materials into works of significance, he hopes to prompt questions about the arbitrary values assigned to objects and people alike, explaining:  The scrap metal has worth because of what I did with it, not because I say it is of worth. The rusted tin can becomes a tone in the face. The shiny metal brings out a highlight on the forehead. All these worthless items have been incorporated into something that someone may now appreciate, and the potential of this scrap item can now be realized.  Small, who lives in his hometown of Camden, currently has work on view as part of Vanguard, which is considering the role of Bristol-area artists who’ve had an outsized impact on British street art since the 1980s. The extensive exhibition, which includes memorabilia and dozens of originals works, is open at M Shed through October 31. If you’re in London, watch for a large-scale mural portrait of the young British entrepreneur Jamal Edwards that Small is working on in Acton, and follow the artist on Instagram to stay up to date with his latest projects.

‘Unbounded’… Who Thought Scaffolding Could Be This Cool?


Ben Butler is fascinated by the complex structures that emerge from simple and delicate processes. This phenomenon can be found in the elaborate systems produced by ant colonies to human cities, small quotidian actions accumulating into overpowering structures. Unbounded, Butler’s installation on display at Rice University Gallery in Houston, Texas, uses this same idea by assembling over 10,000 pieces of poplar wood into a matrix-like structure. This massive arrangement coalesces into an unexpectedly mesmerizing array of grids that stretch to fill the gallery space. Butler approached this installation, as he commonly does within his practice, without initial sketches or ideas of what he would like the structure to look like. He played with the materials, discovering configurations on the spot.

Although the grids within Unbounded were pre-made in his studio, the way they were configured and connected horizontally was all in response to the space. This way of acting in the present ensured that the structure’s outcome would be organic, and not purely responding to a preconceived shape.  Poplar wood was chosen for the installation because of its malleability and abundance, which gave Butler the ability to fiddle with a material that seemed endless. This idea of endlessness also tied into the title he chose for the piece. Butler wanted the piece to have no defined boundary or vantage point, but encourage the audience to walk around and within the structure, discovering it from all angles.

A 27.5 Million Dollar Crib For Sale? By WHO?


It seems, (and this is just speculation) that Trevor Noah, and his partner Minka Kelly have hit a rift. He purchased this 27.5 Million Dollar home in California for the couple, and apparently is now selling it while he’s out touring the world. Trouble in paradise may be sad for any couple, but based on the looks of the home, this will be an incredible opportunity for the next person to buy it. Take a look and tell us what you think… I hope he has a good time on tour.

The New ‘Resident Evil’ Is Here.


Set to 4 Non Blondes’ “What’s Up” (for some reason), this teaser definitely indicates that the movie will take more influence from the video games than the previous franchise, as we see the likes of Claire, Leon and Jill facing off with zombies, devil dogs, lickers, and various other creatures as they attempt to find a way out of the besieged city. Gamers are also sure to recognize some of the locations, and director Johannes Roberts (47 Meters Down, The Strangers: Prey at Night) does seems to have at least made an effort to replicate the dark, grimy chills of the games, but is this really the Resident Evil movie fans have been waiting for? Check out the trailer for yourselves below and let us know what you think.

Katarina Janeckova. A Bodybuilder, Bears, and Beautiful Paintings.


The paintings of Slovakian artist Katarina Janeckova are soused in sex. Three lovers romp around in bed; a brunette poses for naked photos in a swimming pool; a woman spanks her partner with a hairbrush. But there is one thing lacking from her provocative tableaus—men. Instead, the women couple up with brown or black bears, rendered in woozy watercolor or acrylic brushstrokes. “For me, the bear is a perfect substitute for a man,” Janeckova explains. “I paint those bears as simple, strange dark figures, because it allows you to fantasize.” It also allows the women to become the central figures in her works, and for Janeckova to present them as strong and sexually empowered. “It’s a stereotype that pretty women are usually submissive, so I like to play around that,” Katarina says. “Sometimes it’s less visible and more in my head, sometimes it’s obvious or exaggerated.” It’s most apparent in some of her recent works, which portray the massive muscles of female bodybuilders. Katarina honors their forms by depicting them on the side of a Grecian urn, or even turning a container of Muscle Milk into a flower vase. “My ideal of female beauty changed,” Katarina discusses in the following interview, along with sex, symbols and her current exhibition, How to Make a Bear Fall in Love, which is currently on view at Studio d’Arte Raffaelli in Trento, Italy.

Skmei el Luminous: 1229.


That title may seem foreign to some, because it is. That however isn’t what makes the photos of this time piece exotic. If you were under the assumption that this time piece was real, then the visual effects prowess of __ has already got you. Using Redshift and Cinema 4D __ has been able to recreate the 1299 Watch for the client Skmei. This incredibly life-like demonstration of texturing, lighting, and 3D modeling took about 2 weeks to create and is just as impressive as the watch itself.

It’s Going To Be A Shady Superbowl…


It seems as if Slim Shady is headed to the Super Bowl, set to headline the big game’s halftime show in February as part of an all-star hip-hop cast. The Detroit rapper will join Dr. Dre, Snoop Dogg, Kendrick Lamar and Mary J. Blige for the festivities on Feb. 13 at the new SoFi Stadium in Inglewood, Calif.  “Dre day in February?” Eminem posted Thursday afternoon on Instagram. “I’m there!”  The Super Bowl LVI halftime show is the third to be produced by Roc Nation, following performances by Shakira in 2020 and the Weeknd earlier this year. The 2022 extravaganza teams four Dre-affiliated artists with the iconic L.A. producer for the most hip-hop-steeped halftime show in the Super Bowl’s 56-year history.

Kicked in The Digital Balls.


If you take away the heroics of the the United States women’s national soccer team, soccer – football to the rest of the world – remains a blip on the radar in the United States. But while domestic interest languishes, the game’s global appeal grows, including creative branding and gear like the Adidas Capitano Ball, “digital age” inspired soccer balls embellished with printed circuit board designs.

The TPU covered and machine-stitched construction ball also sparkles with metallic incandescent film, adding to the tech-spirited piece of sporting gear. Available in black, white, and a bright “solar red” variation, these stylized, eye-catching designs are intended for casual play and training, and priced accordingly at just $20 (a surefire goal in the holiday gift idea department if your recipient enjoys the global game.). Two additional graphic designs are also available for the same price.

How To Hang A Maze.


Brazillian artist Ernesto Neto is known for his enormous, fiber-based installations that plunge viewers into a multi-sensory landscape of organic elements: people are encouraged to walk through canals of stretched yarn and grasp the structural weavings, while spicy scents like turmeric and cumin are often diffused throughout the room. Similarly immersive and imposing, Neto’s latest work at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston is one of his largest to date. “SunForceOceanLife” is a hand-crocheted, walkable maze of yellow, orange, and green threads that stretch 79 feet across the gallery and spiral 12 feet in the air. The pliable installation centers around “fire, the vital energy that enables life on this planet,” the artist says, sharing that each polymer string utilized is burned at the end to further infuse the piece with sacred, meditative rituals. “I hope that the experience of this work will feel like a chant made in gratitude to the gigantic ball of fire we call the sun, a gesture of thanks for the energy, truth, and power that it shares with us as it touches our land, our oceans, and our life,” he writes.

Plastic balls also fill the pathway and shift underfoot, which forces those passing through the suspended structure to intentionally maintain their balance. Neto explains:

It directly engages the body as does a joyful dance or meditation, inviting us to relax, breathe, and uncouple our body from our conscious mind. The sensation of floating, the body cradled by the crocheted fruits of our labor, brings to mind a hammock: the quintessential indigenous invention that uplifts us and connects us to the wisdom and traditions of our ancestors.

“SunForceOceanLife” is on view at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston through September 26, 2021. You can see more of Neto’s interactive, site-specific projects at Galerie Max Hetzler. (via designboom)

Lia Sabella’s Island Suite.


As much as we’d like it to be, this isn’t a tour of Lia Sabella’s personal island suite, however, it’s something we’d love even more… Her 3rd EP “Island Suite”. The 7 track project features production primarily from ‘F1rst Class’, and is elegantly and filled out with Lia’s mellifluous singing. The songs range in topics like relationships, emotional compromise, and distressing in such a way as to connect with listeners on an emotional level, leaving them feeling relaxed. From the beautiful imagery to the quality of sounds, and fluidity of the entire project, “Island Suite” is one to definitely lay back and relax to, no matter what you may be feeling inside. Take a listen to “Vacation” below, just for a taste of an EP that is for sure to be on repeat in your headphones soon.

Click any of the photos to stream or download the entire R&B project produced by F1rst Class, and once again, beautifully sung by Lia Sabella. If the sultry sounds of this EP don’t leave you in a great place wherever you are, they will definitely make you want to take a getaway… Just look at how relaxed she looks.

When The Words Just… Pop Out At You.


“Miniature monuments, testaments to the power of language and metaphors of imagination.”  Thats how Stephen Doyle describes his angled scaffolding and interlocking constructions.  We just call them dope.  They look as if they grow directly from the bound pages, and sprawl out to comprise his Hypertexts series.  They are unruly and enchanting reimaginings of how information is communicated.

The New York City-based artist lobs off parts of sentences, tethers phrases together with an unrelated word, and generally obscures the author’s intended meaning, producing arbitrary and striking connections within the text. Although the paper sculptures are tangible manifestations of language, Doyle tells Colossal that he originally envisioned the spliced works as satirical commentaries on digital diagramming. “I first started when ‘hypertext’ was a novel term of the internet: blue underlined text was a portal, linked to another document in the ether. 

“I conjured sculptures in which the lines of text shook off the shackles of the page, leapt up, out of the book, and started conferring with their neighboring lines of text, creating an aerial network of language, turning text into synapse, circulation… I soon realized that these three-dimensional diagrams seemed to have a poetic power of their own, recontextualizing language and ideas into sculptural forms, inspired by the books themselves.”

A graphic designer by day, Doyle has spent the last few years expanding his Hypertexts series, which has been featured in The New Yorker, Wired, The Atlantic, The New Republic, and other publications. If you’re in New York City, you also might have seen the triptych he created for the subway a few years back. You can follow his works on Instagram. (via swissmiss)

All The Beautiful Drones.


Beautiful, and spellbinding time lapse photos have been used to display many different mediums in the past. The above example is from DJ Storm’s: “Untitled” beat tape. But where do these images come from, and furthermore, how are they created? Photographer Reuben Wu creates images that reveal an alien splendor in natural and manmade landscapes across the globe. Previously he has explored the brilliant blue rivers of molten sulfur in Indonesian volcanoes, and photographed the thousands of glistening mirrors that compose Nevada’s SolarReserve. For his ongoing series Lux Noctis, the Chicago-based photographer utilizes modified drones as aerial light sources, illuminating obscure landscapes in a way that makes each appear new and unexplored. Recently Wu has evolved his process of working with the drones to form light paths above topographical peaks in the mountainous terrain. 

“I see it as a kind of ‘zero trace’ version of land art where the environment remains untouched by the artist, and at the same time is presented in a sublime way which speaks to 19th century Romantic painting and science and fictional imagery,” said Wu to Colossal.  The light from his GPS-enabled drones create a halo effect around some of the presented cliffs and crests when photographed using a long exposure. An elegant circle of light traces the flight of the drone, leaving a mark only perceptible in the resulting photograph. You can see more of Wu’s landscape photography on his Instagram.

Kyoto Mansion Status.


With over 5,800 square feet of thoughtful modern architecture, Kyoto embodies the true spirit of traditional, minimalist Japanese design. Floor to ceiling views wrap around perfectly balanced zen gardens offering a true retreat in the middle of the Las Vegas desert.

Interior

– Pivot front door

– Stylish courtyard door

– Flat roof

– Slump block walls

– Exposed aggregate drive and walkways

– Professionally designed landscape

– Custom steel window boxes

– Aluminum windows and exterior doors

Interior –

– Square, contemporary corners

– Smooth level 5 finish drywall

– Cat 6 wiring

– Modern, linear gas fireplace

– LED can lights

– Sliding glass doors that pocket (per plan)

– Kohler plumbing fixtures throughout

– 10′ ceilings

– 8′ solid core doors

– Oversized laundry room

– Finished oversized 4-car garage

– Floating staircase

– Steel handrail

– Soaking tub in master bathroom

– Dual shower heads with handheld in master