Posts Tagged ‘ discovery ’

The First Planet OUTSIDE Of Our Galaxy.


THIS IS NOT AN ACTUAL PHOTO OF THE PLANET!

Scientists have found signs of a planet transiting a star outside of the Milky Way, potentially representing what could be the first-ever planet to be detected in another galaxy. Researchers found evidence of a planet in the Messier 51 galaxy, located some 28 million light-years away from the Milky Way, as they detected a dip in brightness in the luminous “whirlpool” system. They used NASA’s Chandra X-ray Telescope to observe transits, which can sometimes occur when planets pass in front of stars and block out a portion of the light. The transit technique has been used by astronomers for years to aid the discovery of exoplanets and exoplanet candidates — all of which have been found in the Milky Way up until now. It’s a method that has produced successful results, though it also presents a few challenges, particularly for scientists wanting a second viewing to confirm their finding. “Unfortunately to confirm that we’re seeing a planet we would likely have to wait decades to see another transit,” said Nia Imara, who co-authored the recently published paper, presenting data that is consistent with a model of a planet candidate. “And because of the uncertainties about how long it takes to orbit, we wouldn’t know exactly when to look.” While attempts to confirm the observation may be thwarted, the study’s lead author, Rosanne Di Stefano, recognized that the potential discovery may help to broaden future studies and “open up a whole new arena for finding other worlds by searching for planet candidates at X-ray wavelengths, a strategy that makes it possible to discover them in other galaxies.”

Valley Of The Blue Flame.


We know this sounds straight out of a Star Wars film, but Ruben Wu was on a trip to visit the Ijen and Bromo Tengger Semeru volcanoes in East Java last month.  Not all of it sounds that strange… he’s a Chicago-based photographer that captured the unusual sight of molten sulphur.  Ok, well, now it gets weird again.  Molten sulphur flows from fumaroles at the base of the aptly named Blue Fire Crater at Ijen. The area is usually swarming with tourists, but Wu stayed after sunset until the moon rose to capture these otherworldly images.

The journey into the Ijen Caldera is not for the faint hearted. A two-hour trek up the side of the rocky volcano is followed by another 45-minute hike down to the bank of the crater. The blue fire found at the base is the result of ignited sulphuric gas that burns up to 600 degrees Celsius (1,112 degrees Fahrenheit) and can flare up to 5 meters (16 feet) into the air. It is the largest “blue flame” area on Earth.  Check the photos out.

UNstudio Envision Nippon Moon Giant Observation Wheel, Japan


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International practice UNstudio was commissioned by ferris wheel investment to develop a giant observation wheel in Japan, an amusement structure that is widely popular as a form of entertainment for the island nation. ‘Nippon moon’ has been envisioned to differ from existing ones of its kind with a comprehensive interactive system, developed in partnership with experientia who assisted in providing research on how behaviour could influence user’s interaction with the architectural and digital infrastructure. One’s all-encompassing experience is largely influenced by an accompanying augmented reality app which focuses on three main areas: discovery, the ride and the return. Upon reservation, one must choose the type of virtual journey they wish to take, as each single or double-story capsule has a different theme relating to history, culture, or the environment. From the moment you buy your ticket, the interaction begins. The digital AR platform allows users to see how many seconds are left until their departure. Upon arrival, participants have the freedom to view the welcome area and facilities in ‘active queuing’, instead of waiting in a traditional line for their turn. Upon embarking, the app which works for smartphones and tablets also functions intuitively with each of the pod’s transparent technological skin, becoming a communication device between cars. this kind of information tailors a one-of-a-kind experience, enhancing one’s perception of their chosen topic. One’s senses are further heightened through the integration of augmented animations and sounds. Afterward pictures taken by visitors are posted to the hall of fame in the lobby, becoming a continuous part of the journey after disembarking. Thus, the design creates an active learning environment for riders with the hope to create a significant memory and impact on japanese culture. The concept of observation wheels is not new, but UNstudio’s concept combines design, with engineering to create a fully integrated virtual world.

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