Posts Tagged ‘ CG ’

Just How Did Star Wars Brought People Back From The Dead?


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With Rogue One: A Star Wars Story having been in theatres for a few weeks now, one of the biggest talking points of the film has been the digital resurrection of the late Peter Cushing as Grand Moff Tarkin. While there were plenty of rumors prior to release about the character appearing in the film, the villain ended up having an unexpectedly sizeable role as a secondary antagonist.

Reactions to the use of Cushing’s skeletal visage have ranged from praise over the effects to derision over morality, though the team behind the film maintains that his involvement was imperative to the story, given Tarkin’s position as Commander of the Death Star in Episode IV. “If he’s not in the movie, we’re going to have to explain why he’s not in the movie,” said Lucasfilm story development executive Kiri Hart to the New York Times. “This is kind of his thing.”

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Industrial Light And Magic worked on Tarkin, with permission and input from Cushing’s estate. Actor Guy Henry portrayed the character on set, with his facial performance replaced by a digital recreation of Cushing in the film’s final cut. The team at ILM used archived daily footage from A New Hope to study and simulate the facial tics of Cushing. “When Peter Cushing makes an ‘aah’ sound, he doesn’t move his upper lip,” explained ILM chief creative officer John Knoll. “He only opens his jaw about halfway, and makes this square shape with his lower lip, that exposes his lower teeth.” Before these nuances in Cushing’s face were accounted for, the team felt like their creation resembled a relative of Cushing, and not the actor exactly. However, their first rule was that “realism trumped likeness.”

While ILM was certain they could pull off Tarkin as a fully-realized character in the film, there were back-up plans just in case, though it would have resulted in a significantly reduced on-screen presence for the character. “We did talk about Tarkin participating in conversations via hologram, or transferring that dialogue to other characters,” Knoll said.

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Some of the criticism stemming from the use of Cushing’s likeness in Rogue One was that it opened the door to using the digital appearances of deceased actors in other films. Knoll, however, said he doesn’t see that happening, with Rogue One acting as a special cirumstance. “I don’t imagine that happening,” Knoll said. “This was done for very solid and defendable story reasons. This is a character that is very important to telling this kind of story. It is extremely labor-intensive and expensive to do. I don’t imagine anybody engaging in this kind of thing in a casual manner. We’re not planning on doing this digital re-creation extensively from now on. It just made sense for this particular movie.”

 

via CBM.com

Organic Geometry


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Organic Geometry was created to show that everything is connected by using digital art in black and white.

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How To Make A Zombie.


The walking dead is one of my favorite shows on TV right now (since Entourage ended).  It’s just interesting to me to see how everyone involved can take a simple zombie movie premise and turn it into a full blown series.  For anyone who hasn’t seen it, it’s a damn good ongoing story that not just all about shooting the undead in the dome.  One of the things that never really grabbed my sense of curiosity was just how they made the zombies in the show.  But the make up designers for the show recently put up somewhat of a tutorial on how exactly they do it.  Check the method.

1. The “Walking Dead” makeup team fits actor Kevin Galbraith with a bald cap and accentuate his high cheekbones to make them look sunken.

2. Next, Galbraith is fitted with rotten-looking, custom-made dentures that can fit under a prosthesis.

3. A custom-made, foam latex prosthesis extends from Galbraith’s forehead to his neck.

4. Makeup artists Kevin Wasner (far left) and Jake Garber glue on individual body wounds. “We had to do his entire upper body. It took 45 minutes,” Nicotero says. Zombie blood is a mixture of Karo syrup, red and yellow food coloring and caramel, plus a drop of detergent so it soaks through clothing.

5. Garber next fits the greasy, sparse zombie wig to the bald cap.

6. Zombies have no time to shave so Wasner adds some stubble and some disgusting dried blood around Galbraith’s mouth. “It’s black sludge in their veins,” says Nicotero.7. The application of hand-painted white contact lenses is the final step of Galbraith’s transformation from working actor to frightening zombie. “The most inspiring part of what we’re doing is that you can have the same person sit in your chair 10 times and they won’t look like the same person when they walk out of the makeup trailer,” says Nicotero.

The New Ghostbusters.


There are some truly great graphic artists out there online who turn in work that rivals those of the professionals who get paid the big bucks. Evidence such another great talent has just manifested itself over at SlashFilm in the form of some great computer animated character designs for one of my favorite films of all-time: Ghostsbusters. The man behind the work in question is Fabrizio Fioretti who merely worked on these designs in his free time on evenings and weekends. The collection reminds me so much of the ‘TMNT‘ version of the Teenaged Mutant Ninja Turtles.  These are truly breathtaking and make our proton-packing heroes look like they just came straight out of Pixar Animation Studios. Here are Fabrizio Fioretti’s computer animated Ghostbusters characters.

CG At Its Best.


I used to major in 3D Animation before I decided to go the way of the pro-DJ, so whenever I see any effects, animations, or examples of CG (Computer Generated) I get excited about the process behind it.  The advertisement above was made entirely on a computer. It might look photorealistic and the details might seem too exact and the shattering objects too precise, but that’s the case. It was made by Alex Roman for Silestone, a company that makes countertops. The video was made by two people in two and a half months.  While the shatter effect is cool, the realism of the fruit really blows me away. Those lemons look stupid real.

After all, I understand how a mineral crashing into thousands of tiny pieces can fool my eyes, but seeing something commonplace, like the lemons or grapes, look that real in HD video is mind-blowing.  More of Roman’s work is available at thirdseventh.com where you can see other impressive videos highlighting architecture, flowing movement, and the use of photographic techniques in computer-generated video. For “The Third & The Seventh” he lists his software used as being 3ds Max, V-Ray (for 3ds Max), Adobe AfterEffects and finally Adobe Premiere Pro.  If you want some insights into Roman’s process, you can check out this excellent behind-the-scenes video he has made available.

I’m Jumpin’ Out The Window With This One.


A small Silicon Valley-based company is making it possible for homeowners to look through their windows and enjoy a view of any scene they desire. Winscape’s virtual windows are designed to transport homeowners to another place — or time — by projecting scenes like the Grand Canyon or Taj Mahal into their living rooms.