Posts Tagged ‘ Tokyo ’

KAWS I Headed To Tokyo And Hong Kong.


Not long ago, KAWS took to Instagram to announce his upcoming solo exhibitions at contemporary art gallery Perrotin‘s Tokyo and Hong Kong locations. The Brooklyn-based artist will present new paintings that draw upon abstract pop art influences alongside visual reinterpretations of iconic pop culture figures. Moreover, new sculptures that portray KAWS’ iconic cast of characters such as Companion and Chum will be on display at both locations.

Via HypeBeast

The future a la Mercedes-Benz


“A chill-out zone in the midst of the mega city traffic mayhem,” Mercedes-Benz calls its latest self-driving concept car, the Vision Tokyo — so named because it’s being introduced this week at the Tokyo Motor Show. “Chill-out zone” actually seems fair, because the interior of this smooth, silver bean of technology is an arc-shaped couch, where up to five passengers can, in fact, chill out.

There’s nothing production-ready about the Vision Tokyo — everything from the fuel cell drive train to the futuristic wraparound displays in the interior is a dream of a far-off world, though Mercedes deserves some credit for focusing on a singularly executed theme: all of its concept cars this year, starting with the F 015 at January’s CES, have looked like birds of a feather. Outside, there’s the otherworldly silver paint covering everything, glass included; blue LED accents around the perimeter make the car look like a prop from Tron and communicate the vehicle’s self-driving intentions to nearby pedestrians (another trick borrowed from the F 015).

Autonomous mode is clearly the focus considering the seating layout, but it’s still possible to take control — a “jump seat” unfurls and a steering wheel pops out on command. That’s not very chill, though; members of Generation Z (who Mercedes says the Vision Tokyo is for) want “personal contact whenever possible,” which they can get with the face-to-face arrangement while the car drives itself.

Among the stranger features Mercedes has envisioned here is a hologram projection system for showing apps and maps in three-dimensional space. There’s also a trick windscreen that will show a graphic equalizer — think a music visualizer from back in the Winamp days — whenever the occupants are listening to music. (Not to say you necessarily want the people outside your car to know what you’re listening to, but it’d look cool, at least.) All this is tied to an emissions-free drivetrain that Mercedes says is good for 980 kilometers (609 miles) — 190 kilometers in electric-only mode and another 790 kilometers in the hydrogen fuel cell.

The exterior of the Vision Tokyo is “comparable” to a “mid-series vehicle” in its dimensions. Arguably, even that’s too big for Tokyo, a hyper-dense city where subminiature “Kei cars” are extremely popular. But if you want to fit five people and play with three-dimensional apps, this concept might be your best choice.

You’ll Never Guess Where Just Blaze’s Newest DJ Set Was Played.


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The answer… A sushi restaurant.  Sounds fishy to you? Well, thanks to a revolutionary Sushi-go-round in Japan, and an experimental sounds system that can detect colored sushi plates and play a specific sound, you CAN technically make music with sushi. Still wonder how? Watch Just Blaze give some Japanese locals a fish-fueled DJ set with the revolutionary system.

Adam Pretty – Sport Photography


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Adam Pretty is a sport photographer since 1998 and lives nowadays in Tokyo. His photographies have already been published in several magazines such as Life Magazine, Time Magazine,Harpers Bazaar and Marie Claire. Besides, Adam Pretty already covered five olympic games. Since 2007, Adam Pretty shifts from sport photography to advertising. His work is very accurate and Adam always the good timing to catch the right moment.

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100 Colors Exhibition – Japan


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With our fascination with both minimalism and color, we’ve kept an eye on Emmanuelle Moureaux, the French-born and Tokyo-based architect famous for her use of candy-hued colors in many of her projects. For many years, Moreaux has explored the use of color and the use of the traditional Japanese paper screens as dividers. Many of her projects in retail, hospitality and public spaces express some combination of the two, using colorful screens as dividers and using color as a space maker.

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Unexpected Layers of Glass


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Born in Tokyo, Dusseldorf-based artist Ramon Todo creates beautiful textural juxtapositions using layers of glass in unexpected places. Starting with various stones, volcanic rock, fragments of the Berlin wall, and even books, the artist inserts perfectly cut glass fragments that seem to slice through the object resulting in segments of translucence where you would least expect it.

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The National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest


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As the final submission date of the 25th annual National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest draws closer, the iconic publication have shared some of the most recent and most interesting entries. The photographs come from four categories – travel portraits, outdoor scenes, sense of place, and spontaneous moments, and include shots from all over the globe, from the Kalahari desert to metropolises like Tokyo.

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Mita Sneakers x Reebok Classic Leather 30th Anniversary


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Continuing on their celebration of the Reebok Classic Leather‘s 30th Anniversary, the brand has collaborated with Tokyo retailer mita Sneakers. This sneaker is a colorful combination of materials and tones, meshing pig suede, sky blue chambray, terry, and glow-in-the-dark on one nicely executed silhouette. Behind this is Shigeyuki Kunii, creative director at mita Sneakers, who is responsible for the innovative design process with which mita approaches its collaborations.

Joël Robuchon gets his own Japanese beer


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Michelin-starred French chef titan Joël Robuchon has lent his name to a Japanese beer that is set to launch early next year. Robuchon has teamed up with Japanese brand Sapporo Breweries to develop Yebisu, a beer made with malt from the Champagne region of France that’s meant to pair well with French cuisine, according to Asahi Shinbum. The red can bears his name and will be served at his Tokyo restaurants, where red is likewise the dominant or accent color at L’Atelier and Rouge Bar. A can of Joël Robuchon beer is priced at 335 Japanese Yen, about €3. The beer is expected to launch February 20, 2013.

Tokyo’s Capsule Hotel


The capsule concept has been around for at least 30 years, starting out as lodging for businessmen working or partying late who missed the last train home and needed a cheap place to crash.

The Shangri-La Hotel in Tokyo.


The Shangri-La Hotel in Tokyo has been named as the number one Luxury Hotel in the World in the Traveler’s Choice 2012 Awards by TripAdvisor.  The awards are based on reviews and opinions provided by travelers and were introduced 10 years ago.  The categories for 2012 have been expanded to include top-25 lists for 30 countries and regions, as well as an international competition for the best properties to visit.  3,943 hotels were recognized by TripAdvisor, with the other categories including awards for best service, best bargain, best relaxation and spa and trendiest hotel.

The judging was a result of more than 60 million comments from visitors, taking into account the quality of service, price and standard of guest rooms.  The Shangri-La, close to Tokyo Station in the heart of the metropolis, took the top spot in the category for the 25 top luxury hotels in the world.  The Hotel Imperial Vienna took the second place on the list and the Hotel Palacio de la Magdalena in Soto del Barco in Spain in third.  La Casa del Rector, in Almagro, Spain, was rated fourth-best luxury hotel in the world, with The Grand Del Mar in San Diego, California rounding out the top five places.

Japan’s Dekotora Scene.


Meet Dekotora: the land of the rising sun’s homegrown and very cool trucker subculture that covers big rigs with neon and ultraviolet lights, colorful airbrushed murals, and shiny stainless or golden exteriors, all the while housing interiors straight out of Brewsters Millions or a 2-star Las Vegas casino, complete with elaborate chandeliers and velvet-lined seats.  This stuff is WILD.  Check the method.

Christmas In Tokyo?


Even though Christmas is not a traditional Japanese celebration, few places in the world mark December 25 with such gusto as Tokyo.  The Shangri-La Hotel, Tokyo has announced a WISH.forJapan Christmas package that is available December 10-25.  10 percent of the price, which starts at Y52,000 per night will go to support people affected by the earthquake and tsunami that struck northeast Japan in March.  The hotel, which opened in March 2009 in the top 11 floors of the 37-storey Marunouchi Trust Tower alongside Tokyo Station, launched its WISH.forJapan charitable program immediately after the disasters struck. The package includes a special bottle of spumante, made by Bottega of Italy, which created a one-off white bottle featuring the logo of the program, as well as WISH candy made by Papabubble, which is originally from Barcelona.  Guests will also enjoy a Christmas cake made by the hotel’s executive pastry chef and breakfast at the Restaurant Piacere or The Lobby Lounge, as well as access to the hotel’s health club and swimming pool.

The Puma House.


In sports world, ‘doing stairs,’ is generally a treacherous endeavor that leaves one with burning calf muscles and an overabundance of lactic acid (Cough, cough… wheeze). The Puma House, in Tokyo, is looking at stairs from a whole new angle. Located in the city’s Aoyama design district, the Puma House encompasses the brand’s press room and event zone, all in one dynamic space, allowing for exhibitions, events, fittings, product launches and other media events.

Cool, grey cement is outfitted in warm wood stairs that encircle columns and serve as a repetition of pedestals, showcasing the new sneaker line. The team at Tokyo-based, Nendo, who curated the space explains, “For our design, we placed ‘staircases’ that climb around the existing features of the space like vines. The resulting effect is a strong reminder that we exercise our bodies daily, going up and down stairs, and has a visual connection with stadium stairs and podiums, to bring in PUMA’s important relationship with sports.” Talk about stepping up their game.

HDR Is Marvelous.


In image processing, computer graphics, and photography, high dynamic range imaging (HDRI or just HDR) is a set of techniques that allow a greater dynamic range of between the lightest and darkest areas of an image than current standard digital imaging techniques or photographic methods. This wide dynamic range allows HDR images to more accurately represent the range of intensity levels found in real scenes, ranging from direct sunlight to faint starlight, and is often captured by way of a plurality of differently exposed pictures of the same subject matter.The two main sources of HDR imagery are computer renderings and merging of multiple low-dynamic-range (LDR) or standard-dynamic-range (SDR) photographs. Tone-mappingtechniques, which reduce overall contrast to facilitate display of HDR images on devices with lower dynamic range, can be applied to produce images with preserved or exaggerated local contrast for artistic effect.

Keep Your Wi-Fi To Yourself.


Researchers at the University of Tokyo in Japan have created a special paint which can block out wireless signals. The paint, which could cost as little at £10 per kilogram, contains an aluminium-iron oxide which resonates at the same frequency as wi-fi – or other radio waves – meaning the airborne data is absorbed and blocked. While paints blocking lower frequencies have been available for some time, this new technology is the first to absorb frequencies transmitting as high as 100GHz (gigahertz). Signals carrying a larger amount of data – such as wireless internet – travel at a higher frequency than, for example, FM radio.

The paint has a number of interesting potential applications including: keeping wireless networks secure, blocking phone calls during movies, shielding hospital rooms from unwanted electromagnetic radiation, and making clothes that protect people from electromagnetic waves.

Urban Neon Nights: Tokyo.


Tokyo will always be one of my favorite places, from the city sky line to the vending machines, it’s truly a mesmerizing place.  Recently I came across a series of photos showcasing the look of the city at night, and I knew I had to share it. Check the method.

Eat Down The Rabbit Hole.


All ‘Alice in Wonderland’ fans can witness the magic of Fantastic Design Works Co.’s new Alice In Wonderland inspired restaurant in Tokyo. The entire story unfolds within the walls of the 2,000 sq. ft. restaurant, from beginning to end. Upon entrance, guests are graced with oversized vintage books, mirrored walls, and polished checkered floors. Making your way to your table, you will find that larger than life grass hedges encase each table. Dramatic theatrical elements are in play throughout the entire space accompanied by intense lighting, various spots of color on the ceiling, and table napkins that sit upright, threatening to march away at any given moment. Fantastic Design Works Co. designed a private dining room that’s fit for a queen! The queen of hearts and the rest of her deck is the main theme of the intimate dining space. The restaurant is an acutely literal take on the 1951 animated movie as it is divided into themed sections that reflect certain scenes from the film. If you are in the Tokyo area stop by for a bite, you never know where it could lead you.

The Paper Castle.


Wataru Itou, a gifted art student from Tokyo, spent 4 years of his life building this incredible paper castle. They called it Umi, it has lights and glows in the dark.

Underneath The Internet Umbrella.


As soon as I saw the first picture of this unique umbrella, I knew my boy Devan would get a kick out it. The Pileus is an umbrella connected to the Internet to make walking in rainy days fun. Pileus has a large screen on the top surface, a built-in camera, a motion sensor, GPS, and a digital compass. The current prototype has two main functions: photo-sharing and 3D map navigation. The photo function is connected to a major web service: Flickr API. A user can take photo with a camera on the umbrella, and pictures are uploaded to Flickr in two minutes with context tags via a wireless Internet connection. User can also enjoy theirselves watching photo-streams downloaded from Flickr with simple operation of wrist snapping.

It also has a function of 3D Map. Detecting a location data from GPS, it shows a 3D bird view around the user. User can walk-through a city comparing the 3D views and real sights, and the map is always updated by GPS and a digital compass. It aims to create natural augmented reality with a large informatin screen on the umbrella.  These two functions can be switched by simply fliping a switch. As a future direction of its development, putting a context data on the Internet (e.g. geo-tags on photos), it will be able to provide social local-navigations and real-time in-place communications. The product aims to provide an augmentation of everyday life synchronizing information on the Internet and the real place. Just don’t walk around without looking where your going.

Toshio Okazaki’s Ultraman Paintings.


Ultraman is a character featured in tokusatsu television programs in Japan. Ultraman made his debut in the tokusatsu SF/kaiju/superhero TV series, Ultraman: A Special Effects Fantasy Series, a follow-up to the television series Ultra Q.   Artist Toshio Okazaki painted some hyper-realistic drawings of Ultraan characters for the Shōgakukan’s edition of Ultra Kaiju published in 1979.

Check Out Ken Block On The Racetrack.


Back in the early days of this blog, I had posted a video of Ken Block featuring Rob Dyrdek that showed of some of Ken’s rediculous drifting skills. I just got a look of another longer, even more insane run, and I knew I had to post it.  It was filmed on the Autodrome in France, and it quite the site to see.  Check the method below.

Tokyo Genso


Tsūtenkaku Tower in Osaka

The illustrations of TokyoGenso (a.k.a. Tokyo Fantasy) depict a post-apocalyptic Tokyo devoid of people and overtaken by nature.  I was blown away by the level of detail in each illustration, and the design of each individual picture.  Check the method.

Tokyo Big Sight

The Tokyo Skyline

Kabuki-za Theater, Ginza

Mode Hal Iko Building, Shinjuku

Sofmap Akihabara

Haneda Airport

Akihabara Bridge

"Manneken Pis" statue at Hamamatsuchō station

Shinjuku station, Tokyo

Neon Sight Japan.


Its been quite some time since I last saw Japan, so when I came across a collection of night photos of sites from all around the country, it made me reminisce.  All the photos below are 1024 x 768 resolution so they can be used as wall papers.  Let me know which are your favorites.

Park Hotel: Tokyo


Its been quite some time since I’ve done some Tokyo chillin… (unless you count rehersals with Tokyo 24 before a concert)  But the next time I go back to Japan’s capital city, I think I’ve found a place I’d love to stay.  In a country renowned for its dedication to cutting edge technology and high-paced business, the Park Hotel Tokyo places itself at the core of Japan’s new networked generation. Occupying 10 floors of the Shiodome Media Tower in downtown Tokyo, the Park Hotel is an integral element in the “city in the heart of the city”; a high-rise powerhouse of international media organizations and television companies, combined with elegant metropolitan living.

Guestrooms project towards Tokyo’s magnificent skyline, connecting guests to the world via broadband internet access, while curved forms and fabric-covered walls cocoon from the maelstrom of activity in the district below. The Park Hotel Tokyo also shows respect for local traditions of nature, translated in the hotel’s glass-roofed atrium. A soothing haven of trees and greenery, it stretches between the building’s 25th and 34th floors, creating a well of warming sunlight that augments.