Posts Tagged ‘ “Started From the Bottom” – Drake ’

Contemporary Artists Fill Museum Walls with Groundbreaking Art


As fans of contemporary art, we’ve always been somewhat surprised by its lack of representation in museums. Galleries like Thinkspace Gallery in Culver City, California—one of our personal favorites—often share the exceptional work of artists today, but why not museums? Thankfully, Long Beach Museum of Art and Andrew Hosner of Thinkspace have teamed up, along with Jasper Hong and Pow! Wow!, to bring an extraordinary display of contemporary art to a museum setting.

With its Vitality and Verve: Transforming the Urban Landscape exhibit, Long Beach Museum of Art is breaking down barriers, and setting a new trend for museums worldwide. Executive Director, Ronald C. Nelson explains, “An opportunity to present an exhibition such as Vitality and Verve: Transforming the Urban Landscape rarely happens in a museum setting. For this exhibition the museum has, for the first time, bared its walls to show murals and paintings created by some of the top international artists working in their field.”

Scrolling down these images, you will probably recognize some of these artists as they have been featured on this site. Participating artists include: Aaron Horkey, Alex Yanes, Andrew Schoultz, Audrey Kawasaki, Brendan Monroe, Brandon Shigeta, Cryptik, Esao Andrews, Greg ‘Craola’ Simkins, Hot Tea, James Bullough, Jeff Soto, John S. Culqui, Low Bros, Meggs, Nosego, Nychos, Saber, and Tristan Eaton.

According to the museum, the exhibit “examines the current developments in the growing field of urban contemporary art. It will feature site-specific ephemeral murals and multi-media installations by established and emerging cutting-edge artists who will be demonstrating the skilled and nuanced application of their craft.

Vitality and Verve aims to illuminate the sensory value and powerful practice of these artists as they transform the urban landscape around them. The meticulous renderings, the hyper-realistic imagery and patterns and the gestural strokes assert the diversity in a fully immersive experience.”

Above: James Bullough / Photo by Eugene Kim for My Modern Met

Artwork by James Bullough / Photo by Eugene Kim for My Modern Met

Artwork by Audrey Kawasaki / Photo by Eugene Kim of My Modern Me

Artwork by Esao Andrews / Photo by Eugene Kim of My Modern Met

Artwork by Jeff Soto / Photo by Eugene Kim of My Modern Met

Artwork by Alex Yanes / Photo by Eugene Kim of My Modern Met

Artwork by C215 / Photo by Eugene Kim of My Modern Met

Photo by Brandon Shigeta and Vincent Ricafort/Pow! Wow! of Kamea Hadar and Reach’s collaboration / Photo by Eugene Kim of My Modern Met

Artwork by Meggs / Photo by Eugene Kim of My Modern Met

Artwork by Cryptik / Photo by Eugene Kim of My Modern Met

Artwork by Andrew Schoultz / Photo by Eugene Kim of My Modern Met

Artwork by Meggs / Photo by Eugene Kim of My Modern Met

Artwork by Nosego / Photo by Eugene Kim of My Modern Met

Artwork by Aaron Horkey / Photo by Eugene Kim of My Modern Met

Artwork by DOTS / Photo by Eugene Kim of My Modern Met

Artwork by Matt Small / Photo by Eugene Kim of My Modern Met

Artwork by Hottea / Photo by Eugene Kim of My Modern Met

Confluentia by Bina Baitel


First prize winner of the international contest for contemporary Aubusson tapestry.
Confluentia project, at the junction between furniture and tapestry, joins in a weaving carpeted furniture and pill rug of Aubusson.
Two wood bedside tables embellished with a tapestry are connected by it, creating a new link, a part of space in the space.
The object appears as a landscape, in the manner of the Aubusson tapestry of the seventeenth and eighteenth century, it is seen as a flat stretch between two woody reliefs.
A domestic landscape creating by the union of two familiar typologies in housing world: side furniture and rug. The tapestry presents an abstract drawing suggesting a peaceful space, like a lake, while being lively by the gush of two headwaters inviting to contemplation.
We can see the pattern of a topographical map, by definition, the drawing of a place. A hybrid territory, a micro-landscape between design furniture and tapestry.
The user goes inside the landscape, lives the scene and becomes an actor in the tapestry. Thus, the action is not only set-up by the look of the tapestry but also ” with, around, on”.
The interlacing of threads and colors is mixed up to build Confluentia, point of confluence between perception in-visu and experience in-situ.

History of Rap 5: Jimmy Fallon and Justin Timberlake


Justin Timberlake And Jimmy Fallon Perform %22History Of Rap 5%22

Jimmy Fallon’s first week hosting “The Tonight Show” couldn’t end any other way. His friend and frequent comedy partner, Justin Timberlake, appeared on the last show of the week. The two riffed about how Timberlake and wife Jessica Biel drank all the booze in Fallon’s home, and Timberlake performed “Not a Bad Thing” from his “20/20 Experience” album. But this duet did and amazing job at going threw a history lesson on rap.