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Posts Tagged ‘ Skull ’

The HYT Skull Bad Boy.


HYT-SkullBadBoy-front

Death. Power. Celebration. The skull is associated with numerous themes, and HYT has used it to great effect in its namesake collection. The Skull watch was first released in two references with red and green liquids, each sporting matching eyes of the corresponding color and resembling a different comic book character. The Skull Maori came next, and had detailing that evoked traditional Maori tribal tattoos. For its latest creation, the Skull Bad Boy, HYT has ventured into the rebellious, grittier subcultures of biking and hard rock.  The most striking aspect of the new release is its fluid module’s black liquid, which had taken the brand over a year to develop.

HYT-SkullBadBoy-Back

It’s worth noting that every new color used in the brand’s fluid modules is an individual “product” whose hue is just one aspect that must be engineered – the liquid must also maintain a defined meniscus within the glass tube, repel itself from the tube’s inner walls instead of sticking to it, have a suitable viscosity and thermal coefficient, and finally be UV resistant.  Chemistry aside, black also represents an entirely new shade for the brand, whose past developments have been confined to bright, almost fluorescent liquids. The new liquid is a perfect fit for the Skull Bad Boy’s monochromic color scheme, which includes a black DLC-coated titanium case and slate grey leather strap. The watch’s overall look is sinister, and fully deserving of its name. The general lack of vibrancy doesn’t translate into a lack of details though. Note how the grey hour indexes on the flange support the theme with their Gothic typeface, and the dial’s Clous de Paris pattern that resembles a leather cuff’s studs.

HYT-SkullBadBoy-Side

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RJ-Romain Jerome’s First Art-DNA Timepiece


 

RJ-Romain Jerome has launched its first contemporary art timepiece under the Art-DNA banner, collaborating with Swiss artist John M Armleder. These Art-DNA pieces are made of polished steel. The skull motif applique is raised and serves to decorate the hammered, polished dial. The skull motif, already featured in mural paintings by Armleder, is said to be inspired by Amerindian culture. The underside of the applique is lacquered with a colour revealed by a subtle play of shimmering reflections on the dial. Each piece is a different colour. The back of the watch is numbered and bears an engraved medallion with the artist’s signature.

The Skull Nickles.


The term “Hobo Nickel” describes any small-denomination coin (though, normally soft nickels) that people carve to create miniature reliefs of…well, all sorts of things. It started sometime in the 18th century but continues to this day; There’s even an entire society dedicated to the art of nickel carving…  This all sounds stimulating, I know, but have a little faith. As with all types of art, something that seems simple in explanation is made beautiful and complicated in the hands of right artists. Check out a few of these “Skull Nickels“, a very surface view of just what carvers do with these “Hobo Nickels“.

Is Your Child Teething?


Yesterday was father’s day, and I spent the day talking to a few of my friends lucky enough to be proud parents.  One of the complaints I heard from a homegirl of mine was that her son was being an “asshole-ish version of Satan himself” because his adult teeth were growing in.  I don’t remember all of what it was like going through the process (cept for realizing the tooth fairy was my mom noisily shoving a dollar under my pillow every other month while she thought I was asleep), but coincidentally I came across a scientific art piece that helped me shed some light on her predicament.  Below is a REAL skull of a human child with their adult teeth growing in.  Seeing it made me understand that sometimes kids go through things I’m happy I don’t have to.  So if you have a little one who’s adult teeth are coming in, cut them some slack.  It can be a painful process.

If that was my face, I'd be cranky too.

Isaac Penard’s “Skullitime”


I’ve been hearing that at first people were getting sick of me talking about how much I enjoy collecting time pieces, then I was told that some people had no idea that some of the watches I’ve written about existed.  So in the interest of informing the public about one of the rares time telling devices I’ve come across, I present a this piece from Isaac Penard.  The lower jaw is hinged to the base of the skull to make a cover for the dial of the watch. The dial is engraved and filled with niello marking the hours with Roman numerals (I–XII) and the half hours with fleurs-de-lis. The skull watch was a specialty of Geneva, and to a lesser extent of Blois, both prominent centers of Protestant watchmakers during the first decades of the seventeenth century. Isaac Penard was a native Swiss who was apprenticed to the Genevan master Jacques Sermand (1595–1651), a well-known maker of skull watches as well as watches in such shapes as tulip buds, crosses, and stars.

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