Posts Tagged ‘ Robot ’

Meet The Robot DJ.


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Watch collaborative robot deliver a storming live set with his mentor, award‑winning DJ Yoda, at the unveiling of the next generation Ford Fiesta.

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So Japan Has Cyborgs Now?


 

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Kunihiko Miyahara loved to surf. His wife, Kaori, points out photos of her husband catching waves as her fingers wander through an album filled with images of the couples’ history.  The Miyaharas met as actors. They played a couple on stage, and although Kunihiko admits that he loved Kaori first, they’ve been happily married for 20 years. Together, they’ve been through thick and thin, good times and bad.  Arguably the worst was when Kunihiko was hit by a motorcycle while riding his bicycle in Tokyo, Japan. In an instant, Kunihiko’s surfing dreams were crushed along with his spine.

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“The doctor told me I would never walk again,” said Kunihiko.  New technological advances in robotics, however, are giving people the ability to overcome some of their physical limitations.  “When I was nine years old, I read the book I, Robot,” said Dr. Yoshiyuki Sankai, a professor, roboticist and founder of robot maker CYBERDYNE. Isaac Asimov’s work of science fiction, which outlined his Three Laws of Robotics, inspired Sankai in his childhood, and the first – to protect humans – informed his work in developing the Hybrid Assistive Limb (HAL) exoskeleton.

As a cyborg-type robot – a fusion of human, robot and information systems — the robot suit HAL, which looks a little like legs of a Stormtrooper, detects signals from the wearer’s nervous system. The wearer of the suit is tasked with re-training his brain to communicate with his body.  Sankai states that HAL can improve damaged physical functionality.

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HAL follows a series of steps: The brain transmits nerve signals to the muscles it wants to move; the skin propagates those impulses as bioelectric signals, which are picked up by HAL, and HAL computes the required movement and level of power exertion accordingly. With the movement occurring in real time, the brain can receive sensory nerve signals from the muscles and joints, and this allows the wearer to improve their impaired functionality.

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“After therapy with the robot suit, I can stand. I can walk. I can use my arms,” Kunihiko said. “My body is changing.” Kaori said a year ago her husband couldn’t do anything. Today he’s a different man.  Dr. Sankai said this is part of what makes the robot suit so special.  “By using HAL, people’s mindset and emotions change,” he said. “It motivates people to have hope.”  HAL is designed to augment human capability, said Paul Tapp, director of technology for Intel. And to do so requires robust processing capabilities.

“Within the HAL robot exoskeleton, there’s an embedded Intel Atom processor,” he said. “That’s really the central processing unit for all of the different sensors and microcontrollers that are taking nerve signals from the human body and interpreting them and feeding back that data.”  The suit’s movement sensors track the patient’s mobility in three dimensions, which helps transmit information about how the patient’s body can and cannot move. Tapp said the data is crunched through a series of complex algorithms that helps physicians determine exactly what kind of enhanced therapy is required.

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Tapp said the robot technology is the futurist fodder used in old movies.  “If you look at the future of an augmented human, you only need to turn to science fiction in the past 30 years,” he said. “The sort of capabilities that inspire kids, teenagers, even adults today, this is really the beginning of it.”  For Kunihiko Miyahara, HAL has helped him believe again in his body. “One day,” he said, “I want to go to the ocean and ride a wave again.”

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via Intel

Micro-Robots


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We’re all familiar with ant colonies, where every tiny creature is running around doing just what it needs to. Well it looks like SRI International has taken inspiration from the giant mounds of insects, to create their own swarms of tiny worker robots that can put together mechanical assemblies and electronic circuits.

Diamagnetic Micro Manipulation (DM3) uses tiny magnets that move under a circuit board, to get the micro-robots to follow a set pattern based on a set of preprogrammed instructions. The system can be set up so just one or a couple of robots are working together, or you can have giant groups of them moving together in sync like some bizarre gymnastics routine. Despite their tiny size, the robots can move up to a foot in a single second, so they can haul around your micro manufacturing supplies pretty swiftly.

SRI says that DM3 can be used for prototyping parts, electronics assembly, biotech lab-on-a-chip experiments, and assembling small mechanical systems in hostile environments. Eventually they plan to scale up the technology, by developing a manufacturing head containing thousands of the little buggers that can build much larger assemblies.

As you might expect, the funding comes from the military, and is part of DARPA’s Open Manufacturing program.

Check out the video where you can see swarms of the micro-robots moving in unison, and then as a couple of them work together to build some pretty amazing truss structures. They even manage to dispense the super glue used to hold the rods together without getting it all over their fingers and sticking everything together.

Giant Robotic Beetle


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Japanese machine shop owner hitoshi takahashi built this 11-meter-tall robotic walking beetle called KABUTOM RX-03. The mobile sculpture, which takes its name from kabuto — a type of rhinoceros beetle typical to Japan — features characteristics typical to the insects like pointing horns and elongated legs. With over 30 moving parts, the machine includes a variety of technological details, such as the ability to shoot steam from the top of its head and its remote controlled legs that can reach speeds up to 4 kilometers per hour. Weighing 17 tons in total, the robot can transport up to seven people with one driver riding on top and six occupants fitting in an internal compartment.

CG Robogirl And Guy Concepts


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Here are a slew of concept images and stills from a music video Samuel Conlogue worked on for Timo Maas & Brian Molko with the guys at Sitcom Soldiers.

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The Auto-Ink Machine.


Chris Eckert (San Jose, California) the artist who created the Auto-Ink machine must be a very trusting guy.  One of the first things someone said when we came across the pictures of this machine was “I don’t trust it.”, and it does look a bit odd.  But after seeing the video below and reading about the basis of the machine, I did have a bit more ‘faith’.

Auto Ink is a three axis numerically controlled sculpture. Once the main switch is triggered, the operator is assigned a religion and it’s corresponding symbol is tattooed onto the person’s arm. The operator does not have control over the assigned symbol. It is assigned either randomly or through divine intervention, depending on your personal beliefs.

Luckily right now it’s set up with a pen, not a real tattoo gun.