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Posts Tagged ‘ photograph ’

Picturesque Foodscapes by Carl Warner


At first glance, the following images look like painted landscapes, including towering hills, picturesque houses and stormy sea in the background. But if you look more closely you will see that the stormy sea was made of cabbage, trees are broccoli or celery and the hills are freshly baked bread. These aren’t paintings but true photos. And everything you can see in the photo is made of real food. Pictures were created by London photographer Carl Warner who made specialty of these food landscapes or how I like to call them “foodscapes”. In recent years he has been commissioned by many advertising agencies throughout Europe to produce his distinctive images for clients in the food industry.

The process is very time consuming, and so the food quickly wilts under the lights. Carl says”

I tend to draw a very conventional landscape as I need to fool the viewer into thinking it is a real scene at first glance. It is the realization of what the real ingredients are that brings a smile, and for me that’s the best part.

These images can take two or three days to build and photograph, with a couple more days spent retouching and fine tuning the images to blend all the elements together. Carl devotes a lot of time to planning each image before he starts shooting, and he spends a lot of time staring at vegetables in supermarkets.

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JKB Fletcher


Usually I like to write about the art, but I will let the artist and his art speak for themselves.

My paintings address questions of whether photorealism or hyperrealism is anything more than a photograph with oil based paint. Using ‘reality’ and sensuality, surface, texture, contrast and form to provoke thoughts and sensations of physicality and beauty.– JKB Fletcher

Great Moments In Bikini History.


1913

Thirteen years after women are allowed to compete in the Olympics, Carl Janzten introduces a two-piece bathing costume to enhance their performance. It’s really just shorts and a T-shirt but tight-fitting enough to cause a bit of a scandal.

1930’s and 40’s

In Europe, women start wearing bathing outfits that reveal a sliver of skin at the waist, and suits shrink stateside as fabric is rationed during World War II. For the most part, hems are shortened and skirts eliminated, but in some cases they do split into two.

1946

With the war over and spirits soaring, Parisian designer Jacques Heim, who works mostly with fur, debuts the atome—the world’s smallest swimsuit.

1947

Louis Réard, a Parisian engineer, introduces an even smaller suit—made from just 30 inches of fabric—and calls it the bikini after Bikini Atoll, the Pacific Ocean site famous for hosting the first atomic bomb test on July 1 of the previous year. Showgirl Micheline Bernardini debuts the suit at a popular swimming pool in the center of Paris.

Early 1950’s

Beaches across Europe and the Mediterranean try to ban bikinis, as do most Catholic countries and the Miss World pageant. But Réard receives more than 50,000 fan letters and launches an aggressive ad campaign saying it’s not a real bikini “unless it could be pulled through a wedding ring.”

1957

Brigitte Bardot makes a splash at the Cannes Film Festival, where she’s photographed wearing a bikini on every beach in the south of France. Hollywood stars like Marilyn Monroe and Esther Williams follow suit in the U.S., but Modern Girl magazine writes: “It is hardly necessary to waste words over the so-called bikini since it is inconceivable that any girl with tact and decency would ever wear such a thing.”

1960’s

In 1960, Bryan Hyland releases a hit single: “Itsy Bitsy Teenie Weenie Yellow Polka Dot Bikini.” Two years later, Ursula Andress emerges from the sea wearing a belted white bikini as Honey Ryder in Dr. No, Sean Connery’s first James Bond film. That same year, Playboy finally puts a bikini on the cover.

1963

Raquel Welch wears a fur bikini in One Million Years BC. The rugged, tattered loincloth she wears on the poster ends up becoming more famous than the actual film, and propels her toward a crowning achievement: Playboy’s Most Desired Woman of the 1970s.

1983

Carrie Fisher takes the bikini off the beach. In Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi, Princess Leia rocks a gold metal bikini that will spawn years’ worth of Halloween costumes.

1988

Réard’s company finally closes, but the bikini’s popularity continues to soar, accounting for more than 20 percent of swimsuit sales in the United States. The suit grows smaller than ever, as G-strings make their way north from Brazil and suits are cut higher than ever at the thigh.

2003

It takes more than a string bikini to make a splash these days, but when Demi Moore walked out of the ocean in Charlie’s Angels: Full Throttle, her comeback turned into the year’s favorite topic of conversation. That scene was credited with reviving her career.

2010

Eva Herzigova wears a retro-looking leather bikini on Adriana Degreas’s Sao Paolo runway. It’s the first bikini that could double as an outfit—if you have Herzigova’s body, that is.

2012

Kate Upton, a relatively unknown model best recognized for doing the Dougie at a baseball game in a Youtube video, lands Sports Illustrated Swimsuit cover of the year. She wears a swimsuit (if you can call it that) that would make Reard himself blush.

Bogart Sues Burberry Over ‘Casablanca’ Photo.


The image in question.

The estate of Humphrey Bogart is suing British-based clothes company Burberry over use of the Hollywood icon’s name in what it said was an advertising campaign.  But Burberry has filed a countersuit, insisting it did not breach Bogart’s rights by using a photo of Bogart wearing one of its trenchcoats in the movie “Casablanca,” and seeking damages from the actor’s estate.  Both companies filed their legal action in the United States on Wednesday, a couple of weeks after the estate raised the issue with the classic English clothing company.  The Bogart Estate filed its action in Los Angeles, saying Burberry used the trench coat picture from the final scene of Oscar-winning 1942 classic “Casablanca,” on Twitter and Facebook, without its permission.

“Burberry’s business hinges on respect for its own intellectual property rights, so it is quite surprising to see that it apparently has so little respect for the clear rights of others.”  But Burberry counter-sued in New York, saying the photo was licensed from photo agency Corbis for editorial use. It said Burberry first contacted it about the issue on April 10.  Burberry said the image was used in the context of a historic “timeline” of the British company, used on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, showing the development of its “culture, products and people” over the decades.

Audrey Amelie Photography


Photo by Audrey Amelie

Every so often, at a gallery, or art show, a piece of art catches your eye, be it a painting, sketch, or photograph.  Most of the time the artists who produce these pieces and display them for the world, have 2 or 3 out of their entire collection that out shines everything else around it.  It’s very rare to find a painter, sketch artist, or photographer who’s every single piece is a masterful work that grabs your attention, and demonstrates that individual is master of their craft.  Audrey Amelie is the type of photographer that displays this type of rare skill with her photos.  Click the pics to see more of her work.

AudreyAmelie.com

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