Posts Tagged ‘ NASA ’

THE MARTIAN – UI SCREEN GRAPHICS


 
The Martian tells the story of stranded astronaut Mark Watney and NASA’s efforts to bring him home. Based on Andy Weir’s novel, the story is set circa 20 years in the future, during NASA’s third manned mission to Mars. Predicated on real science, Director Ridley Scott and Production Designer Arthur Max drew on the expertise of specialists at NASA and the European Space Agency, and asked Territory to craft the screen graphics and UI that would be needed.

As a story that is mediated by technology, hundreds of screens are employed across eight key sets, forming the lens through which the drama unfolds.

Working closely with NASA, Territory developed a series of deft and elegant concepts that combine factual integrity and filmic narrative, yet are forward looking and pushing NASA’s current UI conventions as much as possible.

Territory’s plot-based graphics includes identities and visual languages for each set, and include images, text, code, engineering schematics, 3D visualisations based on authentic satellite images showing Martian terrain, weather, and mission equipment served across consoles, navigation and communication systems, laptops, mobiles, tablets, and arm screens throughout.

In all Territory delivered around 400 screens for on-set playback, most of them featuring interactive elements. With 85 screens on the NASA Mission Control set alone, a number of which were 6mx18m wall screens, there are many moments in which the graphics become a dynamic bridge between Earth and Mars, narrative and action, audience and characters.

20th Century Fox Credits
Director: Ridley Scott
Production Designer: Arthur Max
Sup. AD: Mark Holmes
Motion Graphics Art Director: Felicity Hickson

Territory Credits
Creative Director: David Sheldon-Hicks
Producer: Sam Hart
Art Direction: Marti Romances
Lead CGI: Peter Eszenyi
Design and Animation: Daniel Højlund, Marti Romances and Sam Keehan.

© 2015 Twentieth Century Fox, The Martian

 
 
 

Could ‘The Martian’ Happen In Real Life?


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With martian movies smashing the box office and NASA’s recent announcement to put permanent residents on Mars the big news, space colonization seems like all the rage right now. Following the trend, Exo Planet is a narrative that tells a story that tells of out-of-this-world concepts ranging from base stations to astronaut suits and even vehicles. Beyond that, Exo Planet goes on to detail a mission for a crew of 8 to execute interplanetary travel, architecture using 3D printing, and systems for renewable energy.

via YD

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The Martian – Trailer


 

An epic new trailer for the movie “The Martian” looks even more intense than the last one, and it raises some intriguing questions about the value of human life in space exploration.

Set to the howling Jimi Hendrix song “All Along the Watchtower,” the new trailer for “The Martian,” directed by Ridley Scott, features some thrilling (and stressful) clips of astronauts braving Martian storms, rocket launches and other near-death experiences. The film focuses on astronaut Mark Watney (played by Matt Damon), who is mistakenly presumed dead by his fellow Mars explorers and is left behind on the Red Planet.

When NASA officials discover that Watney is alive, they must decide whether to rescue him and, in doing so, risk the lives of the other six crew members. At one point in the trailer, the director of NASA (played by Jeff Daniels) grapples with the decision, stating, “It’s bigger than one person,” to which another character replies, “No. It’s not.” The film raises the question: If a person willingly embraces the risks of space exploration, should he or she be rescued at all costs?

Geometric Dichroic Glass Installations by Chris Wood


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Artist Chris Wood works with colored glass to create colorful, prism-like mazes and mandalas of light installed vertically on walls. Her most common material is dichroic (meaning ‘two color’) glass, a material invented by NASA in the 1950s that has a special optical coating meant to reflect certain wave lengths of light while letting others through. At some angles the glass appears completely reflective, somewhat like a mirror of gold.

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Luxury Cruise Airship “Aether” Concept


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Based on an airship platform, the “Aether” cruise experience by UK-based designer Mac Byers allows guests to experience a wider range of destinations in a shorter time, all the while enjoying some of the greatest views imaginable. The exterior of the vehicle is conceived to look unlike any airship ever produced – removing notions of danger, like the hindenburg disaster in 1937 . The concept visually communicates a new generation airship that is not only safe but clean, influenced by the thunderbird 2, star wars and the NASA space shuttle. Drawing reference from suspension bridge cables, the lobby integrates structural cords for details like stairways and tables. The interior space has been designed to be as open as possible – encouraging social interaction and providing a communal gathering place for users to meet.

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Inside The World’s Quietest Room


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With what seems like a constant need to chatter away on cellphones or listen to music with earbuds, a little quiet time may be in order. We’ve got the perfect place: the Guinness Book of World Records’s quietest room. It’s so quiet the longest anyone has been able to stand it before beginning to go a bit batty was 45 minutes — to be fair, part of that challenge was to remain in the dark too.  The “anechoic chamber” at Orfield Laboratories in South Minneapolis is 99.9 percent sound absorbing.  The Daily Mail reports the room is made with 3.3-foot-thick fiberglass acoustic wedges with walls made of insulated steel and a foot of concrete. An anechoic chamber in Minneapolis’s Orfield Laboratory holds the Guinness world record for the world’s quietest place at -9.4 decibels. As humans can only detect sounds above 0 decibels, the chamber is virtually soundless. Because the chamber is so soundless, NASA has conducted tests on its astronauts in there to simulate what it would sound like in space. Orfield said manufacturers, like Harley Davidson and Whirlpool, have also used the chamber to test how loud their products are or to evaluate sound quality.

Space Pictures Taken Last Month


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With its high-powered lenses, the Hubble Space Telescope captured this image of the spiral galaxy Messier 77, a large group of stars 45 million light-years from Earth. The colors of the spiral in this image released March 28 reveal that new stars were formed in the red and blue areas. The overall glow indicates that the entire system is rich with ionized gas.

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After it docked with the International Space Station last month to deliver supplies, the SpaceX Dragon spacecraft successfully detached from the station to return to Earth, as pictured in this image taken March 26. SpaceX was the first private company to successfully link a spacecraft with the ISS, which is collectively run by a coalition of countries.

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Gullies on the surface of Mars, likely formed by defrosting carbon dioxide, offer clues about its past and about the presence of water that may have once run over the red planet. NASA scientists use a high-resolution camera, called the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment, onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter to capture detailed images.

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As it passed over the Indian Ocean on March 11, NASA’s Aqua satellite snapped this photo of clouds moving from northwest to southeast. The Aqua satellite was launched in 2002 as part of an ambitious effort to study Earth’s water cycle. As it circles the planet, the satellite observes oceans, cloud layers, and ice, as well as soil moisture and atmospheric vapor.

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NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory captured this image on March 16 as a solar prominence broke apart several thousand miles above the surface of the sun. The image, captured in ultraviolet light, shows a cloud of particles that hovered near the eruption before fading away into space. Guided by the sun’s magnetic field lines, solar prominences can hover over the surface of the sun for days or weeks before erupting. The eruptions can take minutes to hours.