Posts Tagged ‘ Museum ’

‘The Diamond Boutique’. By “Creneau International”.


A diamond exhibition has been designed in Maasmechelen Village by Creneau International, and “It is a BEAUT”.  When they were assigned to create a design for a ‘Love the Diamond boutique’, this INCREDIBLE interior instructor gave life to one of the most artistic, colorful, and visually pleasing exhibitions we here at djstormsblog.com have seen to date. 

They started their design with the origin of the diamond: (crystallized) carbon.  Diamonds consist entirely of crystallized carbon. Carbon can only crystallize at extremely high temperatures and pressure; circumstances found 150 kilometers below ground. Crystallized carbon rises to the surface through volcano eruptions, sealed in volcanic rock.

The black rough stone that emerges from the heart of the earth has, after lots of grinding and polishing, a shiny core with many facets and colors. This is exactly what they see in the interior design. The walls are painted black and look like they’ve plastered them with carbon. At the center of the exposition an iridescent volume is shining in an array of colors and facets.  This can not be exemplified by photos.  This is TRULY a sight to behold.

Contemporary Artists Fill Museum Walls with Groundbreaking Art


As fans of contemporary art, we’ve always been somewhat surprised by its lack of representation in museums. Galleries like Thinkspace Gallery in Culver City, California—one of our personal favorites—often share the exceptional work of artists today, but why not museums? Thankfully, Long Beach Museum of Art and Andrew Hosner of Thinkspace have teamed up, along with Jasper Hong and Pow! Wow!, to bring an extraordinary display of contemporary art to a museum setting.

With its Vitality and Verve: Transforming the Urban Landscape exhibit, Long Beach Museum of Art is breaking down barriers, and setting a new trend for museums worldwide. Executive Director, Ronald C. Nelson explains, “An opportunity to present an exhibition such as Vitality and Verve: Transforming the Urban Landscape rarely happens in a museum setting. For this exhibition the museum has, for the first time, bared its walls to show murals and paintings created by some of the top international artists working in their field.”

Scrolling down these images, you will probably recognize some of these artists as they have been featured on this site. Participating artists include: Aaron Horkey, Alex Yanes, Andrew Schoultz, Audrey Kawasaki, Brendan Monroe, Brandon Shigeta, Cryptik, Esao Andrews, Greg ‘Craola’ Simkins, Hot Tea, James Bullough, Jeff Soto, John S. Culqui, Low Bros, Meggs, Nosego, Nychos, Saber, and Tristan Eaton.

According to the museum, the exhibit “examines the current developments in the growing field of urban contemporary art. It will feature site-specific ephemeral murals and multi-media installations by established and emerging cutting-edge artists who will be demonstrating the skilled and nuanced application of their craft.

Vitality and Verve aims to illuminate the sensory value and powerful practice of these artists as they transform the urban landscape around them. The meticulous renderings, the hyper-realistic imagery and patterns and the gestural strokes assert the diversity in a fully immersive experience.”

Above: James Bullough / Photo by Eugene Kim for My Modern Met

Artwork by James Bullough / Photo by Eugene Kim for My Modern Met

Artwork by Audrey Kawasaki / Photo by Eugene Kim of My Modern Me

Artwork by Esao Andrews / Photo by Eugene Kim of My Modern Met

Artwork by Jeff Soto / Photo by Eugene Kim of My Modern Met

Artwork by Alex Yanes / Photo by Eugene Kim of My Modern Met

Artwork by C215 / Photo by Eugene Kim of My Modern Met

Photo by Brandon Shigeta and Vincent Ricafort/Pow! Wow! of Kamea Hadar and Reach’s collaboration / Photo by Eugene Kim of My Modern Met

Artwork by Meggs / Photo by Eugene Kim of My Modern Met

Artwork by Cryptik / Photo by Eugene Kim of My Modern Met

Artwork by Andrew Schoultz / Photo by Eugene Kim of My Modern Met

Artwork by Meggs / Photo by Eugene Kim of My Modern Met

Artwork by Nosego / Photo by Eugene Kim of My Modern Met

Artwork by Aaron Horkey / Photo by Eugene Kim of My Modern Met

Artwork by DOTS / Photo by Eugene Kim of My Modern Met

Artwork by Matt Small / Photo by Eugene Kim of My Modern Met

Artwork by Hottea / Photo by Eugene Kim of My Modern Met

Guilty Mega Yacht By Jeff Koons


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Greek Cypriot industrialist and art collector Dakis Joannou who green-lighted American artist Jeff Koons and Italian yacht designer Ivana Porfiri to create for him this mega yacht, ’Guilty.’ The stunning looks and amenities of this 115-feet long ship, inspired by the naval camouflage used by Britain during World War I, Guilty’s yellow rhombuses, pink triangles and blue polygons become even more amazing when reflected off the water. Onboard there are 180-degree views of the envious and awestruck rest of the world, along with plenty of bedrooms filled with museum-worthy works of art.

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Art Deco 1930 KJ Henderson Custom Motorcycle


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Looking like a cross between something you’d find in a museum and something you’d find in the Batcave, this custom-made 1930 KJ Henderson Custom is the pride and joy of one Frank Westfall of Syracuse, NY. Underneath all that homespun bodywork is an inline-4 air-cooled engine, though reportedly it’s a little tough to handle. No matter, because really, the less time this beauty has to spend near careless drivers the better. Among the changes Frank made were taking the bike’s original two-tone color scheme and instead going all black. It was first unveiled at the Rhinebeck Grand National Meet in 2010, and the ooh-and-ahh reverberations are still being felt.

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The Fantastical Worlds of Tim Burton at the LA County Museum of Art


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The Nightmare Before Christmas has arrived in Los Angeles’ County Museum of Art…well not exactly, but the museum did a retrospective of the career and works of the film director Tim Burton. The exhibition features over 700 pieces of art associate with Burton’s movies including puppets, storyboards, costumes, photographs, and more from both popular and little known projects from the director.

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Andreas Nicolas Fischer


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Spectral Density Estimation is a pair of sculptures commissioned by the SECCA and the Winston-Salem Symphony orchestra. Two sound recordings of the first organized tuning were taken at the last 2 orchestra performances of the 2012 / 2013 season. Each recording was analyzed and transformed into a spatial arrangement of the audio frequencies over time. The resulting geometry was then carved into a block of wood from a cedar tree, that had fallen outside the museum.

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The Museum Of Nature.


The Finnish photographer Ilkka Halso made images of the nature in a possible future for his photo series ‘Museum of Nature’. To protect the remains of nature it is protected by human made constructions. By combining nature photography and 3D manipulation he sketches a distopian future of our planet’s natural beauty.

Be Your Own Souvenir.


So you’re at the museum, and deep down in the sub-basement right next to the restrooms you happen to discover an enormous machine that looks like it was pulled from the Aliens II movie set. And then you notice you can insert a dollar, and suddenly the machine whirs to life and pipes hot, neon green plasticine into a mold in front of your very eyes as you inahale noxious fumes. Within moments you’re in the possession of a bona-fide neon green submarine, a memento of your visit to the museum that smells strange for days. Be Your Own Souvenir by Barcelona-based blablabLAB is just like that, except a trillion times more awesome. Using custom software developed using openFrameworks and openKinect, visitors film themselves in front of 3 kinect sensors for a full 360-degree scan and within moments a 3D printer known as a RepRap machine spits out a little army guy version of themselves. Every museum in the world should have one of these in their sub-basement, though they can probably install this by the front door.

The Puma House.


In sports world, ‘doing stairs,’ is generally a treacherous endeavor that leaves one with burning calf muscles and an overabundance of lactic acid (Cough, cough… wheeze). The Puma House, in Tokyo, is looking at stairs from a whole new angle. Located in the city’s Aoyama design district, the Puma House encompasses the brand’s press room and event zone, all in one dynamic space, allowing for exhibitions, events, fittings, product launches and other media events.

Cool, grey cement is outfitted in warm wood stairs that encircle columns and serve as a repetition of pedestals, showcasing the new sneaker line. The team at Tokyo-based, Nendo, who curated the space explains, “For our design, we placed ‘staircases’ that climb around the existing features of the space like vines. The resulting effect is a strong reminder that we exercise our bodies daily, going up and down stairs, and has a visual connection with stadium stairs and podiums, to bring in PUMA’s important relationship with sports.” Talk about stepping up their game.

The New Hamburg Science Center.


The Office for Metropolitan Art (OMA) has just revealed their final design for the New Hamburg Science Center and Aquarium. The structure, which will be 23000 meters square of space, will house a science centre, aquarium, theatre, offices, laboratories as well as commercial and retail facilities. The structural design consists of 10 interconnecting blocks that will form the shape of a ring. Not only is the design of the structure trying to encourage new structural forms, but also as being a leader in adapting new environmental technologies included in its’ construction.

The Gucci Museum.


Italian fashion label Gucci inaugurated a museum in Florence Monday, showcasing the luggage and high-end clothing that have fueled the company’s success.  Located in the Palazzo della Mercanzia, the museum is only a few steps away from the 13th century Palazzo Vecchio and Michelangelo’s David.  The museum features an exhibit showing how their logo has evolved since Guccio Gucci, a former porter at the London’s Savoy hotel, founded the company in 1921.  Covering 18,460 square feet over three floors, the Gucci Museo is arranged by theme and not in chronological order. In the private basement are the Gucci archives.  On the ground floor will be a coffee shop and bookstore just downstairs from a display of handbags, red carpet outfits, and other archival pieces from Gucci.  On the second floor of the museum is a display of garments and artworks that are emblazoned with the GG logo.  Ahead of the public opening, some 200 celebrities, including the Vogue magazine chief Anna Wintour and US artist Bill Viola, attended a party held in the 14th-century palace in central Florence where the exhibits are installed.  Admission to the museum will be 6 euros with half going to help restore the City of Florence.

Japan Holds The Worlds Most High-Tech Globe.


If you want to see what Earth looks like from space, become an astronaut (or, barring that, a space tourist). For the next best view, pay a visit to Tokyo’s National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation where a massive, nearly 20-foot spherical OLED orb–the world’s first large scale spherical OLED–offers a satellite’s-eye view of the planet in super high resolution.

“Geo-Cosmos” is made up of 10,362 OLED panels that display continuously-updating satellite footage of our tiny blue marble, representing what our planet looks like from space in something close to realtime. It replaces an earlier model covered in LED panels, offering museum-goers a full 10 million pixels, a resolution 10 times greater than its predecessor.

And like any good museum exhibit, Geo-Cosmos is interactive. Touchscreens surrounding the globe allow viewers to tap all kinds of earth science data streaming in from all over the world, like simulations showing the origin of the March 11 earthquake that devastated Japan and the dispersion of all of that energy via tsunamis that reached all the way around the Pacific. See it for yourself below.

Louis Vuiton: Voyages.


Louis Vuitton may have lost prime advertising space in China when its giant suitcase was torn down in Shanghai, but it is now wooing customers in the hallowed halls of the national museum in Beijing.  The Louis Vuitton Voyages exhibition, marking the French fashion house’s 20th year in China — the world’s fastest growing market for luxury goods — features hundreds of canvas trunks and leather handbags dating back to the 1860s.  Louis Vuitton is already the brand of choice for many of China’s increasingly wealthy middle class and analysts said the show in the heart of the capital would help cement its dominance of the country’s high-end market.  The display also reflects a growing trend in China for luxury products to use museums, art galleries and film festivals to promote their brands in the hope of appealing to more sophisticated and well-educated consumers, they said.  Earlier this year, US designer Diane von Furstenberg showed off a selection of her creations at an exhibition called Journey of a Dress in Beijing‘s trendy 798 art district.  The Louis Vuitton show “is quite a clever thing to do because it is a very premium and prestigious setting”, Sam Mulligan, director of Data Driven Marketing Asia in Shanghai, told AFP.  “It suggests history and longevity and being in the business for a long time — all of these things are important in this market.”

Shaun Rein, managing director of China Market Research Group, agreed.  “Louis Vuitton consumers are very interested in buying a brand with long-term heritage… and I think that’s why Louis Vuitton is very smart to partner with the museum.”  The newly refurbished National Museum located across from Tiananmen Square hopes the exhibition will “inspire the domestic cultural design industry”, the People’s Daily website quoted museum deputy director Chen Lusheng as saying.  The glitzy show of trunks and handbags is in stark contrast to the centuries-old bronze vessels and porcelain vases on display in other parts of the museum.  Louis Vuitton, whose products have been promoted by celebrities from former Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev to U2 singer Bono, is no doubt hoping to boost its position in China’s booming luxury sector.  China is forecast to be the world’s top buyer of luxury productssuch as handbags, watches, shoes and clothes by 2015, according to consultancy PriceWaterhouseCoopers — but analysts say brand loyalty can be fickle.  “Right now Louis Vuitton is the dominant player but they are going to have massive problems in the coming five years” as people start to buy their second or third luxury handbag, said Rein.  “After you’ve bought Louis Vuitton or Gucci, do you go back to Louis Vuitton and Gucci or do you try something different?”

Despite its popularity among well-heeled consumers, Louis Vuitton has run into problems with the authorities.  Workers began dismantling Louis Vuitton’s 20-metre-high suitcase in a busy shopping district of Shanghai last month after the government ruled it breached size restrictions for outdoor advertising, state media said.  Huang Chen — the proud owner of two Louis Vuitton handbags — said the exhibition in Beijing would help Chinese consumers better understand the history of the luxury designer and boost sales.  “Young people will understand why it became a major brand,” Huang told AFP as she toured the show with her 18-year-old daughter.  “The quality is good and they are useful. It is more convenient to use than other bags.”  But the People’s Daily — the ruling Communist Party’s mouthpiece — has criticised the museum for holding the exhibition, saying it was “too commercial”.  “Shouldn’t the National Museum raise its threshold and make its selection stricter when introducing an exhibition?” the newspaper said on its website.  But student Wang Jing, a confessed Louis Vuitton lover, gave the exhibition a big thumbs-up.  “I like the general feel (of the handbags). Even though it is simple on the outside, the inside is detailed. I really want to buy one.”  I’m sure once she saves the money, that is.