Posts Tagged ‘ Making ’

THIS Is Why A Rolex Is So Expensive…


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If you’ve ever wondered why a Rolex was so expensive you may want to watch this demonstration of a Rolex Submariner being disassembled, showing the intricacies involved in the time piece in exquisite detail.  The demonstration is of course performed by a professional watchmaker, who meticulously picks apart the watch with great skill.  Although back in the 50’s, they weren’t as expensive.

“First revealed to the public in 1953, the Rolex Submariner was a diving watch for everyone. Appealing to both professional and hobby divers, the Submariner set the standard for the category, its affordability and practicality unmatched. Rolex also developed non-chronometer versions of the Submariner that were even more affordable, costing roughly two weeks’ pay at the time.”

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Creating The Future In 3 Dimensions.


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A few weeks ago, someone on the DJ Storm’s Blog writing team heard a random kid say something about “You want I should give him the CLAMPS?!” which sparked a group-wide “Futurama” binge watching session on Netflix.  (Where the entire series is featured for your viewing pleasure.)  Following multiple team members watching the full series, we stumbled onto a 3D Futurama test shot conceived by digital wizard “seccovan”.  Check out how he put together this incredible re-imagination of the Futurama world.

If you took the time to see all the incredible detail that went into a project of this scale, check out the amazing, but very short, finished product.

 

 

BTS: In The Studio With Cazette.


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Watch Cazette at their Stockholm studio and go deep into their forthcoming track “One Cry” and discover how it was made using Image-Line’s FL Studio software. 

2Pac’s Back.


“We worked with Dr. Dre on this and it was Dre’s vision to bring this back to life,” said Nick Smith, president of AV Concepts, the San Diego company that created the hologram. “It was his idea from the very beginning and we worked with him and his camp to utilize the technology to make it come to life. You can take their likenesses and voice and … take people that haven’t done concerts before or perform music they haven’t sung and digitally recreate it.

The Tupac hologram was several months in the planning and took nearly four months to create in a studio and though Smith was not able to reveal the exact price tag for the illusion, he said a comparable one could cost anywhere from $100,000 to more than $400,000 to pull off. “I can’t say how much that event cost, but I can say it’s affordable in the sense that if we had to bring entertainers around world and create concerts across the country, we could put [artists] in every venue in the country,”

How Do They Make The Aston Martin One-77.


Luxury automotive manufacturer Aston Martin, synonymous for building some of the finest and most desired cars on the planet, gives us an in-depth look at how one of their newest models is made. The One-77, an amalgamation of the company’s achievements throughout its near-century long history, is equipped with a 750 horsepower V12 that translates into a hardly-believable top speed of more than 220 mph. And while most will state that there are other super cars available that could easily top 250 mph, Aston Martin prides themselves in saying that none are as gorgeous as the One-77. The article gives us a closer look at the fine details concerning material, factory cleanliness, and even some clamping techniques to ensure the resulting product is 100% perfect and ready for delivery.

J Cole Live On Stage At Rutgers.


I got a hold of some footage of a recent J Cole performance in my home state of New Jersey.  He tore down the stage at Rutgers, and in the process even did some production on stage.  Check the footage below from via Hot Mop.

Got Them QWERTY Beats.


A while back, I posted up the “Incredibox“, an interactive website that allowed you to create some pretty impressive melodies using beatbox samples from a French artist.  When my assistant came across “Qwerty Beats” however, I realized that although these two sites are based on the same concept, “Qwerty” allows for a much larger range of complexity, and holds the potential to actually be a nice compact beat making tool. (Or a massive distraction during office hours.)

Click here to play