Advertisements

Posts Tagged ‘ flexible ’

The COMB Construct Bench.


It’s difficult to believe that a design as beautiful as this is composed almost entirely of recycled materials. Named after the shape that makes up its two flexible seating points, COMB is constructed from blown out bike inner tubes and plywood leftovers. The bike tubes form the stretchy surface for the honeycomb-shaped sections that sink in to create a comfy, form-fitting seat when one drops down. When they stand, it pops back up to form a planar surface with the rest of the bench again. It’s the softer side of wood seating.

Advertisements

“Dras”tic Cell Phone Changes May Be In Our Future.


drasphone_1 drasphone_5

The Drasphone tries to combine two undeniably massive trends in cellular phone design. The clamshell trend of the 90s, and the present touchscreen display trend. Pioneering flexible display technology, this conceptual smartphone bends at not one, not two, but at three points. This allows you to make the Drasphone compact in two ways. Do a half fold, and you have a Squarish MiniDras, or a complete fold, and you get a MicroDras.

drasphone_7 drasphone_6 drasphone_2

If you haven’t noticed, a small section of the display is exposed when in MicroDras mode. This nifty feature allows you to have all your notifications and relevant data visible to you even when your phone is in sleep mode.  Now while I strongly believe that large moving parts in a smartphone can result in major wear and tear (remember how easy it was to snap a clamshell phone?), I’d love to see a working prototype before I can make any promises.

(via YD)

drasphone_4 drasphone_3

Curved Cell Phone Screen


Samsung-Youm-project-600x399

The US patent, No. 8,603,574, is for a manufacturing process that would enable a screen to remain responsive to touch despite the effects of curving or shaping. Although Samsung has been the only one so far to create a live demonstration, Apple is the one that actually owns the technology. As part of the initial filing made in 2010, Apple specifically provides examples of its use in displays, touch pads and even mice. It also explains that current methods for curving a display result in a less sensitive and responsive screen; the process creates ‘dead’ areas. Apple’s approach uses a film that is applied to a screen or surface before it is shaped, which would ensure that its whole surface remains touch-sensitive once curved. The filing also gives examples of more complex shapes, like waves as well as simple curves, that would be possible thanks to the process that Apple is patenting. Whether or not the patent is a signal of Apple’s future intent remains to be seen but there is little doubt that curved and flexible displays are set to play a huge role in the future of mobile device design. Samsung and LG, two of Apple’s biggest competitors in the smartphone and tablet space, have already launched smartphones with curved, flexible displays as showcases for their own display capabilities.

Nike Flyknit Air Max


nike_flyknit_airmax_00

For the first time ever Nike have paired innovative Flyknit technology with the ultra-cushioned ride of the classic Air Max. Working alongside runners at the Nike Sports Research Lab, the designers were able to produce a lighter and more flexible shoe, using a redesign Waffle outsole for better traction, unique flex grooves to encourage a smoother transition, and integrated Flywire technology for additional support throughout the upper. The Nike Flyknit Air Max comes in two colourways – red/green for men and pink/orange for woman.

nike_flyknit_airmax_02

Nike Free Trainer 3.0


Nike-Free-Trainer-3.0-Bonjourlife.com_

Nike Free Trainer 3.0 is a blend of advanced technology and articulated design. Weighting less than 9 ounces, Nike Free Trainer features flexible, breathable, supportive, strong material and as light as air. Expected to launch in January 1, 2013.

Nike-Free-Trainer-3.0-Bonjourlife.com-20

Advertisements
Advertisements