Posts Tagged ‘ endangered species ’

Animals Your Children May Not See.


We live in a world of diversity and wonder. Nature has endowed our blue planet with an abundance of plants, animals, and insects. Yet, we have for far too long taken our world for granted.  Now we risk mass extinction of some of the world’s most beautiful and exotic creatures. From pandas to dolphins, elephants to macaws, these animals come from across the globe. They have little in common. Their habitats differ. They come from different continents and oceans. This infographic exposes the fate of some of the world’s most endangered species.  This was demonstrated when the Yellowstone wolves were hunted into extinction. Beavers almost followed, because the elk that the wolves had hunted, thrived and overgrazed. This left nothing for the beavers to eat. In 2018, the world lost the last male northern white rhino. Around the world, awareness grows of the need to take urgent action to prevent the extinction of yet another of Earth’s precious creatures.  We must preserve the world for the next generation. We can do our bit by protecting wildlife habitat and using sustainable and recycled products. Avoid products made from endangered or threatened species. Let’s take action to preserve our earth’s diversity.  

What Do Endangered Animals Look Like?


We know that the fate of endangered species is a global issue, but it remains an abstract concept to many of us. We aren’t confronted with the faces of these creatures on a daily basis; but thanks to the work of photographer Tim Flach, these mammals, reptiles, fish, and birds are shown in striking portraits that make it impossible for us to turn away. His poignant series (and book), aptly titled Endangered, features these creatures locking eyes with us—it’s much different than the typical pictures of animals where they are captured within their grandiose natural environment. Flach instead pits them against a stark backdrop and completely divorces them from their habitat.

The decision to visually remove some of the endangered creatures from their environment was deliberate. “The romanticizing, free, wild images of the animals weren’t necessarily getting people to take action,” says Flach.  “I wanted to think about what kind of images people engage in and how you tell a story to get people to connect to [the animal].” The “mild anthropomorphizing” of animals is shown in research to make us feel a greater connection because the creatures have personalities we can relate to. “Images often done in a style and representation that was more like humans was more likely to make us care more.” The resulting endangered animal photos give a human-like existence to these creatures.  Tell us what you think in the comments.

Synthetic Creatures


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Synthetic living creatures would be released into the wild to save endangered species and clean up pollution under this futuristic proposal by designer Alexandra Daisy Ginsberg. Called Designing for the Sixth Extinction, the project is designed to trigger debate about how artificial organisms could be used to solve environmental problems. Ginsberg has proposed four new species, including a slug that leaves a trail of alkali to neutralise acidic soil, and a porcupine with sticky rubber spines that would help disperse seeds of threatened plants. There is also an artificial puffball that kills tree-damaging pathogens when it bursts; and a biofilm that grows on leaves and absorbs pollutants and viruses, safely removing them when the leaves fall in autumn. The creatures would be designed, patented and produced by corporations in the same way that industrial products are developed today. The corporations could use the creatures as a form of “biodiversity offsetting”, to make up for environmental damage caused by their activities. The creatures would be engineered to contain a genetic “kill switch” that would prevent them from over-breeding and creating new environmental problems.

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