Advertisements

Posts Tagged ‘ DIY ’

The Battery Box.


The Battery Organizer, as simple as it may sound, can be quite a life saver. Designed with precise optimization, it makes space for any and all batteries you may use or need, in quantities depending on their popularity/acceptance and need. The rack can hold up to 93 separate batteries and makes individual slots for everything from D size to C size to your ever-useful AA and AAA sizes. Beside that, you’ve even got slots for 9-volt batteries and even a little cradle for storing those tiny little tablet batteries.

The organizer gives you a singular storage space for batteries (even encouraging you to stock up), so that you don’t have a drawer cluttered with batteries… Plus if you do have a drawer cluttered with batteries, the Battery Organizer comes with a battery tester (hallelujah) that allows you to easily test and see which batteries are worth keeping or which have run out of charge and need discarding. Now you can thank us later… go grab those batteries and get back to your important work!

Designer: The Battery Organizer

Advertisements

Creative Ideas That Will Make Your House Cool


1. Wall that becomes a dining table

creative-home-ideas-1

via: freshhome.com

2. Drawer-stairs

creative-home-ideas-2

via: boredpanda.com

3. Lowered living room conversation pit

creative-home-ideas-3

via: homekulo.info

4. Cat-hammock table

creative-home-ideas-4

via: eandy.com

5. Drawers hidden unter the stairwell

creative-home-ideas-5

via: boredpanda.com

6. Basement glass pool

creative-home-ideas-6

via: caandesign.com

7. Indoor hammock

creative-home-ideas-7

via: jeremyperson.com

8. Aquarium Shower

creative-home-ideas-8

via: dornob.com

9. Window sill reading nook

creative-home-ideas-9

via: homedsgn.com

10. Two-level hot tub

creative-home-ideas-10

via: aqua-saar.de

11. Underground spiral wine cellar

creative-home-ideas-11

via: droold.com

12. Living room pool

creative-home-ideas-12

via: dornob.com

13. Slide beside the stairs

creative-home-ideas-13

via: demilked.com

14. Secret passage bookshelves

creative-home-ideas-14

via: bookriot.com

15. Suspended bed with skylight

creative-home-ideas-15

via: jjlocations.com

16. Aquarium coffee table

creative-home-ideas-16

via: droold.com

17. Vacuum baseboards

creative-home-ideas-17

via: aerusvacuums.com

18. Indoor slide to the pool

creative-home-ideas-18

via: curbed.com

19. Beer light fixtures

creative-home-ideas-19

via: pinterest.com

20. Stackable fridge (if you have roommates)

creative-home-ideas-20

via: yankodesign.com

Wuderkind.


350b4e1c2e5aabae8b1575720f2de235 191ac605d0a578ba69eacfc8690395cf 984d5baf2716f53fb410aac65297e90b 095b77c2e2d747e41fc968450d7a5a1e c0adea1ac9f0744cf0f26d6f50afae74 84d72fbd102c8c945f85a80e2af0313d a88d4cf591e6241cec9e811833b926cd d18fa058076c651efddafdf66073ac9d 86a4cc78e6ceb89230656b4f7749b3e8

When one thinks of collages, the inside of a 13 year old girl’s notebook peppered with Bieber photos is probably the first thing that comes to mind.  But when it comes to hand made collages, the skill and execution can be fare more astonishing.  A fashion collaboration with Wolfgang Joop for his German fashion brand ‘Wunderkind’ is where this incredible collection of images stems from.  The Spring-Summer collection’s main theme was a famous Janis Joplin quote: “Freedom is just another word for nothing else to lose”.  Ashkan Honarvar, the primary artist describes the thought process as such….
My main goal was to create images that radiated freedom, color, life and a certain fiery spark that matched Wunderkind’s image and the wonderful quote from a time when the word ‘freedom’ meant something different.
 

a972c13721bb5a0c61b1f82348648fa6 f1a01af4e82b956b6c51eb71b7b96240 3925b531582544b0a6b5cbe1e0603c5c 9ede3e8d33b0dab5bba8a4b032669520 3ef86dee240786892d45cffeca13d11e 593f5421caf73ad1de4adf88ce0835b1 d5df513ab7b6942894e56fcc6696d5a0 45d49b9aae90b78562e71a5dc17591bf fe2825fc0deef32d9ab47b58ae4a78cb

The TetraBox Light.


Designer Ed Chew takes a green step in the right direction with the TetraBox lamp, a light object made from discarded drink packets that would have otherwise ended up in landfills already packed to the brim. The design is achieved by unfolding the packets and refolding them into hexagonal and pentagonal sections that are then pieced together to form a geodesic sphere or any other desired shape. Here, the Epcot-like ball makes an attractive overhead light and casts an impressive web of shadows and shapes on the surrounding space.  Super dope.

Old School ‘Do It Yourself’ Ads.


Anytime we see ad’s from the 30’s or 40’s, things just strike us as odd.  (I know for me in particular, the ads the say cigarets improve your health), but things in general just kind of didn’t make sense.  That was never more apparent when I saw a collection of Do It Yourself Ads from that time period.  People were advertising things that didn’t make sense, would take years of expertise to accomplish, or were just downright impossible.  But in the 30’s and 40’s, I guess it was perfectly fine to sell nothing but a dream.

S

Phonograph: June 1919

Can’t afford a phonograph? Try building one yourself. The Modern Phonograph Supply Company offered blueprints, diagrams, and metal parts to customers who were confident enough to construct 1919’s hottest gadgets by themselves. The Makafone cost just one-fourth the price of a regular machine of equal quality, came with a bundle of free records, and could be sold for a profit of $50 – $75.

S

Erector Set: December 1935

During the holiday season, we advertised A.C. Gilbert’s No. 7 1/2 Motorized Erector set as a last-minute Christmas present. What boy wouldn’t uphold “25 pounds of scientific thrills” as the world’s greatest toy? As the illustration shows, this kit could actually produce hundreds of different steam shovels, ferries wheels, airships, automobiles, and more. The kit also came with a toy motor for additional realism.

S

Telescope Lens Kit: April 1941

Do-it-yourself telescope kits might be common nowadays, but you’d be hard-pressed to find parts that cost just $1.95. Brownscope’s 100x telescope lens kit, which was suited for refracting telescopes, came with two astronomical eyepieces and one polished objective lens. As if you weren’t saving enough money by buying an inexpensive lens, the advertisement also recommended making a profit by charging people to look through your newly-upgraded telescope.

S

Trailer Shell: June 1949

A 12-foot trailer for $299? Sounds like a sweet deal to us. DIY trailer kits from U-BUILD-IT came with everything you could possibly need for a basic shell: windows, doors, exterior panels, tires, roof ends, and a chassis, to name a few. The kit required no experience and no expensive tools.

S

Magic Art Reproducer: January 1958

Now, this advertisement is a little vague about how the product actually works, but what can you expect from a $2 mystery gadget described as a “magic art reproducer”? According to the description, this tool would turn real-life objects into faint line drawings. With a little bit of tracing, talentless artists would be able to sketch everything from the human body, to bowls of fruit, to blueprints at a professional level.

S

Electronic Organ: March 1960

While fine organs take years of training to construct, this DIY kit allowed just about anyone to build their own electronic organ for just $18.94. You could also order a 10-inch LP demonstration record for further instruction.

S

Fireplace: September 1967

While a DIY fireplace seems like a challenging, even hazardous, home project, The Majestic Company claimed that you could build their wood-burning fireplaces without any expensive tools or masonry. It could fit in any room (except the bathroom, of course) and came in a variety of styles. You could choose from a corner fireplace, a front model, and pick either real brick tops or synthetic brick tops.

S

Gyrocopter: November 1968

Speaking of hazards, how about the Bensen Aircraft Corporation’s build-it-yourself gyrocopter? Anyone who bought this would be the envy of his neighborhood. The gyrocopter came with interchangeable wheels and floats, required less landing space than a plane, and would glide gracefully to the ground if the engine broke… Or so it says on the box.

S

Kit-a-Month Program: November 1969

While most of our DIY kits catered to home construction and car modification, we certainly indulged readers with a penchant for science projects. For just a $1.00 enrollment fee, and $4.95 per kit, you could make your own analog computer, light transmitter-receiver, weather station, atomic energy lab, and more. Members could either receive the kit on a monthly basis, or they could order all the projects at once for $49.50.

S

Jet Powered Space Ranger: December 1977

Maybe we should just end the gallery here because clearly, nothing can beat this mail order item. The Space Ranger could reach a height of 5,000 feet, could take off and land vertically, and ran on “easily obtainable fuel.” Despite its fantastical appearance, the Space Ranger could be easily assembled in just a few days (supposedly). The entire thing cost 250 pounds and was available for a mere $5,795.

S

DIY Sports Cars: October 1982

Embarrassed by your unsightly Corvair? Try outfitting it with a glamorous bolt-on body. With a little bit of tinkering, you could become the proud owner of a T-Bird, Porsche, or Ferrari, without going into debt over your purchase. Unlike the original sports cars, though, the bodies of kit cars are made of fiberglass coated in polyester resin instead of sheet metal.

S

Cartridge of Tear Gas: February 1949

This isn’t exactly a DIY project, but we couldn’t resist including it in our roundup of mail order items. Before fog horns became the vigilant civilian’s weapon of choice, people carried cartridges of tear gas in their purses as a defense against attackers. Pens could shoot tear gas at a distance of 15 feet. Unlike most of the other kits advertised in the back section of our magazine, this one could be ordered for free. Safety first.

S

Radio Hat: October 1949

Long before pocket-sized music devices were invented, Victor T. Hoeflich’s Radio Hat was the frontrunner in portable entertainment. The circuit was sewn into the hat’s lining, while the radio was powered by a small external battery pack. Despite its kooky appearance, this hat was a triple threat: for just $7.95, you could make a fashion statement, shield your eyes from the sun, and listen to your favorite programs.

Advertisements