Posts Tagged ‘ Concrete ’

Baitogogo by Henrique Oliveira


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Brazilian artist Henrique Oliveira’s striking new installation “Baitogogo” has now opened at the Palais de Tokyo in Paris. The complex “network of organic materials” sees existing concrete and plaster pillars transform midway into contorted and intertwining organic material reminiscent of the Amazon rainforest. The piece is typical of Oliveira’s work, which often uses materials from the Brazilian urban landscape such as wood taken from fences surrounding and blocking access to construction sites. Through these materials, Oliveria aims to highlight the organic growth of São Paulo’s favelas as well as the “endemic and parasitic nature of these constructions.” Inspiration is also drawn from medical textbooks and studies of physical pathologies such as tumors.

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Contemporary House, M Buenos Aires in Argentina


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Argentinian architectural practice Fritz + Fritz Arquitectos and Analia Messina have designed  project. The beautiful property can be found in Lujan, a province of Buenos Aires, Argentina.  It is a single-family house project which was designed from its orientation and environmental characteristics. The house relates with the environment by its transparency and also introducing three patios, that divide the different areas of the house, mostly solved on the ground floor. The ground floor is connected to the master bedroom by a contemporary stair. On the south face of the house, the main access and all the services were located in order to generate a total permeability to the north side and the environment. The use of materials such as concrete, glass and wood where used to achieve architectural synthesis.

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M House by Marcel Luchian Studio


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Marcel Luchian Studio designed the minimalist M House in Singera, a town in the Republic of Moldavia. Composed of unconventional forms, the residence’s concept design also does a brilliant job of marrying materials with a combination of glass and concrete, both inside and out. The house’s structure is made up of two off-center forms, one on top of the other, steering clear of a traditional box-like design. The overhang from the second floor provides exterior coverage below, perfect for when it’s raining. The two stories also contrast in color, with the darker shade being on the bottom. The interior continues the harmonious use of light and dark materials with dark polished floors alongside white and neutral-toned furnishings and walls.

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Instalacao Nightclub, Porto, Portugal


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As far as nightlife goes, in Porto, Portugal, it is all happening downtown. A local company, Baixa, has recently added another downtown nightclub to its roster that already includes the Baixa Bar.  The new nightclub, Instalação (installation), was designed by José Carlos Cruz Arquitecto, the same team responsible for the design of Baixa Bar as well as the Farmacia Lordelo. The space for Instalação, opened in late March, was in essence a long, narrow corridor with two dividing structural arches that support the building itself. From this 250 square-meter (2,690 sq.ft.) space the designers created a golden wire tunnel where the main materials are concrete, brass and polished aluminum. Inspired by various works of Olafur Eliasson,the team created a glowing, floating lighting program that helps expand the space visually and draws the attention to reflections and illumination, away from the narrow framework of the room.

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OLS House by J. Mayer H. Architects


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This is the hillside OLS House by J. Mayer H. Architects. With a composition of filleted corners and sweeping curves it is intended to maximize landscape views in an otherwise suburban area. A deep, recessed balcony characterizes the sinuous concrete form and protects the home from solar heat gain thereby continuing an environmentally friendly building system that includes weathered zinc and solar panels. Intended to house a family of four the building’s elevated ground floor is buried into the hillside. The open plan first level contains the gathering spaces: living, dining and kitchen areas are enveloped by floor to ceiling glazing, allowing natural light to bounce off the curved walls. The full-height windows provide unobstructed views of the valley and garden. Upstairs bedrooms and bathrooms are connected to the lower storeys by a large central staircase, its steps surrounded by folded, curved planes. Slats and anti-glare sheeting combine with industrial materials like screed to create an environmentally conscious architecture that at once invites the landscape to its abstracted interior.

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Inside The World’s Quietest Room


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With what seems like a constant need to chatter away on cellphones or listen to music with earbuds, a little quiet time may be in order. We’ve got the perfect place: the Guinness Book of World Records’s quietest room. It’s so quiet the longest anyone has been able to stand it before beginning to go a bit batty was 45 minutes — to be fair, part of that challenge was to remain in the dark too.  The “anechoic chamber” at Orfield Laboratories in South Minneapolis is 99.9 percent sound absorbing.  The Daily Mail reports the room is made with 3.3-foot-thick fiberglass acoustic wedges with walls made of insulated steel and a foot of concrete. An anechoic chamber in Minneapolis’s Orfield Laboratory holds the Guinness world record for the world’s quietest place at -9.4 decibels. As humans can only detect sounds above 0 decibels, the chamber is virtually soundless. Because the chamber is so soundless, NASA has conducted tests on its astronauts in there to simulate what it would sound like in space. Orfield said manufacturers, like Harley Davidson and Whirlpool, have also used the chamber to test how loud their products are or to evaluate sound quality.

House Tati with dramatic views, Johannesburg


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Johannesburg-based architectural practice Nico van der Meulen Architects have completed the House Tati project, a contemporary five-storey home that was finished in 2011, and can be found in Bassonia, Johannesburg, South Africa. The luxury South African property was redesigned and ingeniously transformed into a contemporary home. The building is located on a very steep and narrow site with 180° views to the east, which allowed the architectural design to take advantage of the spectacular views, but acted as a challenge when the architects wanted to add habitable space. The contemporary makeover was given to the entire building: from the street to the east façade one can enjoy the modern feel thanks to the use of concrete, steel and glass.

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Sun control became key element of the design and the main architectural feature, since the building is mostly facing east. The northern and western façades are screened by the use of vertical louvres to allow sun control and degrees of privacy from adjacent properties. Northern sunlight enters the interiors through new double-volume glazing in the main staircase shaft, while pipe pendant lights from renowned designer Tom Dixon add a touch of luxury and visually connect the volume with the staircase below. The entertainment area and the children rooms are situated one floor lower, at the 3rd level. Here there is a private TV home theatre, a covered terrace with the pool deck, and the main suite on a mezzanine level. Finally, on the ground floor one finds a gym, home spa, hobby room and the squash court as well as a wine cellar and tasting room. The architectural style is complemented by the contemporary interior design, which was developed taking into account the ambience of a city pad with the main focus turned to the views.

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Concrete Business Cards By Murmure.


Made of concrete these business cards will not leave you indifferent. Playing with the notion of scales, Murmure created a set of business cards made of concrete. This material, so characteristic of our environment, was enhanced by using the smallest and most refined communication support. The refinement and the technique required for the typography highlight the harshness and the roughness of the used material.

The Modern Concrete House.


When you first think about the words concrete house, you might imagine a cold, sterile environment, perhaps something similar to a prison. If that’s the case, this one story house designed by architecture studio A-cero will likely change your mind.  Located on the outskirts of Madrid, Concrete House II features a façade that boasts a spectacular view of the whole house. The first impression that visitors usually get is that the building seems to be hidden between concrete walls and ramps that extend up to the roof. Upon further inspection, they find a vegetation area that climbs towards the sky.  The back of the house opens up towards the garden where the lounge, dining room, library, study, and bedrooms are found. Outside, the plot includes an elegant garden and small lake, while the roof features solar panels and a renewable energy system.