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Posts Tagged ‘ camouflage ’

Paint Me Up Scotty.


It was not that long ago at all that we posted some amazing work from Ekaterina Belinskaya, but here some more is yet again.  Yet again this incredible photographer has caused wonder and amazement to the eye with this series of these wildly fantastical shots.  The collection is titled  “Paint Me Up”… Check the method.

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Casio G-Shock 2013 Holiday “Blizzard White” Collection


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Casio‘s iconic G-Shock line offers a three-piece collection of seasonally apt new colorways for the coming winter holiday. The “Blizzard White” collection sees the GW-8900, GA-100 and GD-X6900 models brandished in stark white-grey with a matte finish — a military inspired choice as it’s originally used for snow terrain camouflage. The white-grey adorns the main bezel of the three, while further applications of military motifs are found on the faces with precise detailing down to the signature red star embellishments. As for functionality, the GW-8900 comes with a multi-band 6 station radio system covering China, US, UK, Germany and two Japan stations, while its Tough Solar program automatically re-calibrates for the accurate time. The GA-100 offers a 1/1000 second stopwatch function, speed measurement recording and maintains magnetic resistance, while the more basic GD-X6900 comes with G-Shock’s classic illuminating and 20bar water resistant perks.

Mimic Octopus


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Of all the amazing octopus species out there, the mimic octopus,Thaumoctopus mimicus, is perhaps the most bewildering. While most known octopuses are able to change color and shape for camouflage, mimic octopuses can also impersonate other animals to deter would-be predators. They can contort their bodies and long, striped arms to look–and swim–like other (less edible) sea life, including lionfish, sole and banded sea snakes. These implausible creatures were only first discovered by scientists in the 1990s in Sulawesi, Indonesia. Since then, the mimic octopuses have been found in various waters around that island country, but not too much farther afield. They are generally active during the day but live primarily on obscuring sandy or muddy sea floors–down to about seven meters.

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But these odd octopuses have now made a confirmed appearance on Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, more than 2,000 kilometers from where they were first described. Divers had reported sightings of these strange cephalopods in recent years, but Darren Coker, a researcher at James Cook University’s ARC Center for Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, verified this species’ presence there, in a report published online earlier this month in Marine Biodiversity Records. This animal’s presence on the Great Barrier Reef also suggests that the reef itself is home to even more exotic animals that we previously imagined. The Great Barrier Reef may contain many more undocumented species from the Indo-Pacific region. But due to the limited familiarity…new species are going undocumented.

mimic octopus

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