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Posts Tagged ‘ 3D printed ’

Now You Can Print Your Own Bike?


Apart from the electronics, and the rider, every ounce of the BigRep Nera is 3D printed. From the handlebars, to the body, to the seat, suspension, and even the tires, the Nera is an absolutely stunning feat of design and engineering melded together to show how far additive 3D printing has come. The e-bike’s body comes with an edgy, chiseled design that gives it character and strength, and even includes a flexible bumper underneath the seat to absorb shock. Even the airless tires are made from 3D printing, with a lattice structure that gives it both strength and flexibility, allowing it to mimic natural rubber tires.

A 3D printer selling company, BigRep came to limelight with their airless bicycle tires that we featured earlier this year. The Nera takes BigRep’s PRO FLEX filament and TPU printing technology to the next step, not only by building an entire vehicle out of it, but by building a much more powerful vehicle that tests the material on a much more advanced level. What’s next… a sportscar? A manned drone?? Who knows!

Via: Marco Mattia Cristofori & Maximilian Sedlak of BigRep

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A Look Back At A 3D Printed Limb.


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This may not be people’s first time seeing this 3D printed exo-prosthetic leg.  But it sure is remarkable enough to take a look back at.  The ‘exo-prosthetic leg’ was created by Adam Root, this 3D printed artificial limb uses modern technologies to fabricate its customizable, intimate, form-taking design to fit the leg. Developed to resolve the time intensive, costly and tedious current process of adapting a prosthesis to an amputee’s specific anatomy, this design enhances a combination of a 3D scanner, printer and modeling software in order to create a more precise and affordable manufacturing procedure.

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Scanning technologies such as an inverted laser, form a highly precise virtual model of the patient’s residual limb and matches its anatomy to within a fraction of a millimeter. This, as well as the MIT biomechatronics lab developed fitsocket that captures leg tissue properties to enable a better fit, is then ready for 3D software modeling. All this information is combined in a custom-patterned mesh model and is hollowed out into an exo-skeleton, to reduce weight. By fusing together titanium dust particles in a laser sintering process, an extremely durable, lightweight and biocompatible prosthetic limb.

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Seamless 3D-printed Dress for Burlesque Dancer Dita von Teese


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New technologies mean the design process is becoming akin to “creating a Hollywood film,” says designer Francis Bitonti, who created a seamless 3D-printed dress for burlesque dancer Dita von Teese.  Speaking about the development of the dress at the Wearable Futures conference in London, Bitonti says that developments in computer-based design and 3D printing mean that designers are no longer limited by their knowledge of materials. “The separation between what you can simulate and what you can physically model is gone”, claims Bitonti, founder of New York luxury fashion studio Francis Bitonti Studio.

Worlds First 3d Printed Metal Gun By Solid Concepts


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It seems there’s no end to 3D printing’s potential, and the world’s first 3D-printed metal gun is the latest innovation to be birthed from the budding technology. Many of you will remember the first 3D printed plastic gun (it was literally toasted after firing off just one shot), but this is something entirely different. The folks at Austin, Texas based Solid Concepts have created a metal 3D-printed gun using DMLS (direct metal laser sintering) technology, and this thing shows a lot of promise. Unlike its plastic predecessor, the metal version of the 1911 series firearm has fired off 50 rounds, and still going strong, with no damage to the gun itself (at least that’s why Solid Concepts says).  Before you get too worried about your neighbor printing out a batch of guns, the company says that “there are barriers to keep the public away from the technology for years.”

 

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