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Posts Tagged ‘ Lights ’

Long Exposure Airplane Photography.


Terence Chang has compiled an absolutely stunning collection of long exposure photos of aircraft taking off at the San Francisco International Airport. The method is Beautiful.

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The Shade Club.


If there’s one thing I can appreciate about a club (aside from the female bartenders that work there) is the interior… And the ‘Shade Club’ has it in spades.  SquareONE’s latest renovation, located in the basement of a residential building in the center of Bucharest, was once home to some of  the most successful and downright sexy clubs of the 90s, some of which carried a notorious and even dark past. After 5 years of vacancy the Shade Club has opened its doors to reveal a sultry modern design that reflects the scandalous history of the venue.

At the start of the remodel, the design team noticed 7 to 8 layers of material applied to the walls, giving them a peek into the location’s history, and sparking their interest in its mysterious past.  The first of the 3 defined spaces within the club is also the largest and features a high density of structural pillars. By covering the pillars in mirrors and applying three-quarter lamps across two edges on each, the columns seem to disappear and a “forest of lamps” emerge. The volumetric pattern on the surrounding walls is CNC dense polyurethane foam painted white. Behind the pattern are mirrors that continue the visual effect of the mirrored pillars.

The second space is a circular room that surrounds the central lounge. Given the shape, the designers opted for an organic design that incorporated baroque decoration. The single row of structural pillars were covered in a Corian skin. It is a soft, organic shape vertically extruded. The Corian skin was engraved with the graphic design CNC milled into the surface of the material, then a special mold was made and the Corian milled plates were thermoformed. The semicircular bar in the this space was done exactly the same. The walls have a routed MDF structure, and thin, extremely flexible Axpet cladding to which graphic designs were cut and applied on the surface.

The third and smallest space is quite isolated from the rest, and features handmade graphic designs on the walls and a single lounge. Hovering above the lounge is a  ellipsoidal light membrane on the ceiling made of a elastic membrane that diffuses the light. To polish the look the designers used white fringe to better illustrate the shape and link the two elements.

In the bar areas there are virtual sections that cut the volume and leave white luminous surfaces with 2D images of different objects (lamps, tables and other household furniture). The ideea was to illustrate a photo of the interior of a house that cuts out volume and leaves an impression. To contrast the space the designers used Corian Noir in combination with translucent Glacier Ice Corian. Spectral tubes were then used as light sources to illuminate the white surfaces.

The Affinity Chair.


Ben Alun-Jones’ latest work is an attempt at the impossible: invisibility. ‘There is something of an ideology in chair design,’ he explains, ‘that really what you want to sit on is nothing – like you’re supported by air. That’s how I began creating a chair that, in a way, wasn’t there. A structure made out of light.’ The ‘Affinity Chair’ is unlikely to win any prizes for comfort, but it pulls off an impressive vanishing act.

Plastic acrylic sheet and one-way mirror film are used to create a structure that reflects and merges with its surroundings. The chair not only responds to and camouflages itself to match its environment, it also interacts directly with the sitter: sensors activate pulsing LEDs hidden within its frame that quicken like a heart beat as it is approached. The effect is eerie: as the chair is lit from within, its reflective surfaces becomes transparent and all its edges are illuminated. The chair’s disappearance is an attempt at escape; yet this strangely animate object remains rooted to the spot, it’s vanishing body revealing a further hidden space within.

Alun-Jones’ explains his work as using technology itself as an artistic medium to challenge existing perceptions. His materials are unconventional – LEDs, ultrasonic sensors, custom-built and programmed circuit boards. The result is new, challenging, and anything but robotic.  The Affinity Chair will feature at the Royal College of Art Interim Show (Wed 2nd – Mon 7th Feb) as well as appearing at V&A Connects with… ARTS THREAD (Tues 25th Jan) and the V&A Digital Festival (Sat 5th March), both at the Victoria & Albert Museum, London.

Lichtfaktor Light Show.


Photographic tricks have always amazed me, and playing with lights in dimly lit areas always has an interesting effect.  The good folks over at Lichtfaktor have perfected this technique and use to to create a dazzling array of images and videos.  Check out some of their work.

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